Tag Archive | "Paul Cayard"

Tags: , , ,

Robert Scheidt glides through qualifier at Star Sailors League Finals in Nassau

Posted on 07 December 2013 by Valencia Sailing

It is becoming difficult finding superlatives to qualify Robert Scheidt’s and Bruno Prada’s performance this week in Nassau. Regardless of their starts or the, very few, tactical errors they might make, the Brazilin duo will always find a way, especially downwind, to crawl back in the fleet and finish at the top. In the nine races of the qualifying round Scheidt and Prada scored four victories, three seconds, one third and just one fourth! All that in a fleet of 18 boats whose crews are among the best of the best in small-boat sailing.

Although the top of the overall leaderboard was more or less decided, the most interesting aspect of Friday’s action was the true dogfight that went on for the all-important 10th place that would make the difference between spending a nice weekend snorkeling in beautiful Nassau and taking a shot at the $200,000 of prize money available on Saturday. Special mention should be given to Denmark’s Michael Hestbaek who, with a sixth and a second, got the much-coveted tenth place, made the cut and left, among others, Paul Cayard, Flavio Marazzi, Ed Wright or Pieter-Jan Postma out.

The top ten crews of the Qualifier Round will now advance to Saturday for the quarters, semis and final race. The format that will be used is a different approach and solution to what is perceived to be a “problem” in the sport of sailing, that is that the boat that wins the final race of the event isn’t necessarily the overall winner of the event. Conventional wisdom now wants a format in which if you cross the finish line in the lead you should also win the regatta.

The Star Sailors League’s approach is to hold three races in the final day. The top ten boats of the qualifier will hold one race, called quarterfinals, where the qualifying order is disregarded. The top seven of that race will then advance to the “semifinals”, which also consists of one race. Finally, the top four of that semifinal will battle it out together in the final race. The boat that claims that race will also win the inaugural Grand Final of the Star Sailors League and, of course, pocket the $40,000 of prize money. Does this approach add a factor of randomness into sailing? Time will tell.

Conditions are expected, again, to be very similar to what we have experienced so far this week. The forecast calls for blue and sunny skies, a light to moderate breeze, maybe a couple of knots higher, and flat seas. As the tide advances by 50 minutes each day, by the time racing starts, the current and wind have the same direction and eliminate the chop that is evident early in the morning.

Star Sailors League Finals – Qualifier Results after 9 races (1 discard)
1. Robert Scheidt (BRA) / Bruno Prada (BRA) – 2,(4),1,3,1,2,2,1,1 – 13
2. Mark Mendelblatt (USA) / Brian Fatih (USA) – 6,2,3,5,3,7,(9),3,3 – 32
3. Diego Negri (ITA) / Sergio Lambertenghi (ITA) – 1,1,6,9,2,13,6,(15),11 – 49
4. Xavier Rohart (FRA) / Pierre-Alexis Ponsot (FRA) – 7,6,5,10,6,1,11,(17),5 – 51
5. Eivind Melleby (NOR) / Mark Strube (USA) – 3,8,10,4,(14),3,4,12,7 – 51
6. Robert Stanjek (GER) / Frithjof Kleen (GER) – 13,5,2,(16),7,10,5,5,8 – 55
7. Mateusz Kusznierewicz (POL) / Dominik Zycki (POL) – 4,(14),4,6,12,11,3,8,9 – 57
8. Johannes Polgar (GER) / Markus Koy (GER) – 11,15,(17),15,5,5,1,11,4 – 67
9. Augie Diaz (USA) / John Von Schwarz (USA) – 8,7,7,13,8,(19),12,9,10 – 74
10. Michael Hestbaek (DEN) / Claus Olesen (DEN) – 5,11,12,17,16,9,(16),6,2 – 77
———— Cutoff for Saturday’s final races ————
11. Andy Maloney (NZL) / Tyler Bjorn (CAN) – (17),12,11,7,11,8,14,4,15 – 82
12. Paul Cayard (USA) / Austin Sperry (USA) – 9,16,14,12,4,15,(18),2,13 – 85
13. Flavio Marazzi (SUI) / Renato Marazzi (SUI) – 14,(18),13,1,13,14,15,10,6 – 86
14. Ed Wright (GBR) / Petter Morland Pedersen (NOR) – 10,9,(15),14,15,12,7,7,12 – 86
15. Jonathan Lobert (FRA) / Pascal Rambeau (FRA) – (18),3,8,11,18,4,17,16,18 – 95
16. George Szabo (USA) / Craig Moss (USA) – (16),10,16,8,9,16,10,14,14 – 97
17. Tomas Hornos (USA) / Joshua Revkin (USA) – 15,17,9,(18),10,6,13,13,16 – 99
18. Pieter-Jan Postma (NED) / Edoardo Natucci (ITA) – 12,13,18,2,17,(19),8,18,17 – 105

Race 1
Yesterday we were wondering what it would take for Scheidt and Prada to commit an error that would bear a heavy cost. The answer was given in today’s first race and it, probably, is nothing! Conditions were quite similar to Wednesday and Thursday with a light to moderate breeze from 8 to 12 knots and flatter seas. However, wind direction had shifted to right by approximately 15 degrees and the right hand-side of the course became more favored. This was evident in the two false starts and general recalls as the fleet was packed together at the committee boat.

When the third start was given, Diego Negri and Robert Scheidt hit the line right at the pin end and opted for the left-hand side of the course. The boats that had instead sailed to the right got the upper hand with Paul Cayard, Michael Hestbaek and Mark Mendelblatt ahead at the first weather mark. Scheidt was lagging, at the back of the fleet, but, once again, that seemed not to matter. Mendelblatt took the lead at the bottom gate, ahead of Cayard but Scheidt had already climbed to fifth. Scheidt and Prada were truly a rolling train downwind. The rounding order didn’t vary in the second weather mark and again Scheidt left no options to his opponents, glided down the Bahamians waters, overtook everybody that stood on his way and took the win. Paul Cayard finished second, an exploit if one considers he last sailed a Star in 2004.

Start of the day’s first race. Negri and Scheidt opt for the pin end. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Diego Negri in the first beat of the race. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

The pack of the fleet on the left-hand side of the course paid the price of the right shift. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Paul Cayard leads at the top of the first beat. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Paul Cayard rounds the first weather mark in the lead. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Mark Mendelblatt rounds the first weather mark in third place. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Flavio Marazzi rounds the first weather mark. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Johannes Polgar rounds the first weather mark. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Robert Scheidt rounds the first weather mark at the back of the pack. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Mark Mendelblatt rounds the bottom gate in the lead. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Robert Stanjek rounds the bottom gate. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

The back of the fleet rounds the bottom gate. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Mark Mendelblatt rounds the second weather mark in the lead. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Paul Cayard rounds the second weather mark in second place. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Good performance by the young Kiwi sailor Andy Maloney. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Michael Hestbaek sailing in the last run. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

An all-American second and third place. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Race 2
The day’s second and final race was much more straightforward. The left was again favored and that’s what Robert Scheidt did. He started three-quarters to the pin end of the line, opted for the left and took control of the race. Mark Mendelblatt and Michael Hestbaek were alternating in second and third place but the Dane prevailed and crossed the finish line ahead of the American. Hestebaek’s performance in the last day of the qualifiers was remarkable, securing him the all-important 10th place.

Start of the day’s second race. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

George Szebo sailing in the first beat of the race. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Ed Wright sailing in the first beat of the race. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Robert Scheidt rounds the first weather mark in the lead. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Michael Hestbaek rounds the first weather mark in third place. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Robert Scheidt leads at the bottom gate. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

The back of the fleet at the bottom gate. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Jonathan Lobert sailing in the second beat. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Mark Mendelblatt rounds the second weather mark in third place. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Paul Cayard had an average second race. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Robert Scheidt and Bruno Prada gaze back at the rest of the fleet as they cross the finish line and claim yet another race. Nassau, 6 December 2013. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Comments (0)

Tags: , , ,

First ever Star Sailors League Finals to be held in Nassau; Scheidt and Cayard just two of the champions competing

Posted on 30 October 2013 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Star Sailors League] The Star Sailors League (SSL) is proud to announce its first ever event: the 2013 SSL Final. The invitational event will be held at the Nassau Yacht Club from December 3rd to December 8th, 2013, with the best Star sailors from 11 countries competing. Most of the leaders in the SSL Ranking list have already confirmed their participation – Robert Scheidt (BRA), Xavier Rohart (FRA), Freddy Loof (SWE), Eivind Melleby (NOR), Michael Hestbaek (DEN), Flavio Marazzi (SUI), Johannes Polgar (GER), Robert Stanjek (GER), Mateusz Kusznierewicz (POL), George Szabo (USA) and Diego Negri (ITA). Also confirmed is Paul Cayard (USA), long time Star sailor and 1992 Louis Vuitton Cup Winner, who will compete as a welcome guest. Further participants will be confirmed.

Legendary champions
The provisional entry list, which includes three Olympic Gold Medallists, 11 Olympic Class World Champions and a Louis Vuitton Cup winner, represent the first and the only time after the Star Worlds and 2012 Olympic Games that so many international Star champions will race together.

New format
This event will also be the first Star event with the new race format – for all 18 boats, regatta style racing for three days, with no more than four races per day and a maximum of nine races in all – followed by an innovative fourth day: the top ten from the previous days will compete in the three final races with a progressive drop-out of three boats per session. So the last day of racing will begin with ten boats in the quarter final, seven in the semi-final and only four in the final. The overall winner of the event will be the team that first crosses the line in the final race, and will receive 4,000 SSL points.

Impressive prize money
In this debut event, USD 200,000 will be awarded in prize money, to be divided amongst the whole fleet. Prizes also include the Best Skipper of the Year award, while the Best Crew of the Year will receive the first “Simpson Memorial Trophy”, in memory of British Star sailor Andrew Simpson.

Live 3D coverage and virtual gaming
All races will be broadcast live on the official website www.starsailors.com with Virtual Eye technology, the same tracking that was used during the recent America’s Cup. Virtual engaging doesn’t stop here: Sailors from all over the world will be invited to “play” the Star Sailors League with Virtual Regatta INSHORE. The SSL has partnered with Many Players to develop a unique event. As Philippe Guigné, Many Players CEO explained, “We’re happy to work with the Star Sailors League and offer the opportunity to play before, during (live) and after this event to all our 1 million players. Here we are making a new step, for the first time on the INSHORE game offering the magnificent Star boats and the unique SSL ranking system.”

The launch of Star Sailors League movement
The inaugural “Grand Final“ will officially launch the League’s activities, and with five days of competition will put the emphasis on men rather than machines. The League was established last January: the birth of a dream of Olympic and amateur sailors to build an international regatta circuit to promote athletes and their skills. Under the name of the “Star Sailors League”, the organisation brings together all the Star Class regattas and defines a new World Ranking (based on the model of the “ATP World Tour” created by tennis players in 1972), with more than 2,400 skippers and crew already ranked in the SSL Ranking. Drawing its inspiration from tennis and its annual “Masters”, the SSL Board is launching the Star Sailors League Final which will be sailed at the end of each year.

Comments (1)

Tags: , , ,

Iain Percy to become new Artemis Racing team manager

Posted on 12 September 2013 by Valencia Sailing

Update: In what regards the nationality rules Emirates Team New Zealand and Luna Rossa might impose, there is an important issue we overlooked. Törnqvist might be Swedish, however he has no obligation whatsoever to represent a Swedish yacht club in order to challenge for the 35th America’s Cup. Outteridge is Australian and could very well build an Australian core group, so the obvious solution would be to challenge through an Australian yacht club.

If you have been following this website during the current America’s Cup cycle, the statement the Swedish billionaire and owner of Artemis Racing made today in an interview with Bloomberg’s Aaron Kuriloff shouldn’t come as a surprise at all. In fact, we have written extensively in the last couple of months about it and it was widely rumored since a month or so that Paul Cayard was on the ejection seat.

Törnqvist seems to have full confidence on Percy and states that “Iain is one of those people who never seeks leadership, but people ask him for it and that’s very unique. Iain has that charisma and that personality — he earns it somehow.” If Törnqvist is sincere in this interview, it appears he’s seriously contemplating to continue his America’s Cup adventure and challenge for the 35th edition of the world’s oldest sports event.

Artemis Racing will keep a core group of people to build around Percy and Nathan Outerridge, helmsman of the Swedish team, and see what happens before taking a decision whether to go ahead or not. However, there seems to be potential hurdle in the Swedish billionaire’s plans, mainly the prospect of stricter nationality rules onboard the racing yachts.

Iain Percy is now the new Artemis Racing team manager. Photo copyright Sander van der Borch / Artemis Racing

If Emirates Team New Zealand comes out victorious in San Francisco, Luna Rossa will be the Challenger of Record and both Grant Dalton and Patrizio Bertelli have made public statements strongly in favor of imposing nationalities rules. Even if they soften the regulations and allow 20-25% of foreign nationals onboard, it is difficult to imagine they will not require the key afterguard positions, especially the helmsman, to be of the challenging team’s nationality. Outteridge is a superb sailor that “can drive anything”, according to Törnqvist. He won an Olympic Gold medal last year in the 49er class but he’s not Swedish.

In any case, it’s encouraging to see Törnqvist already planning for the next campaign, despite the serious and tragic setbacks the team suffered in the last three years. It’s also good to see Percy taking such a prominent position in what could certainly be one of the most serious America’s Cup challengers.

Comments (2)

Tags: , , ,

Video: Artemis Racing updates on its 7th day of training

Posted on 04 August 2013 by Valencia Sailing

It only took seven day for the Swedish America’s Cup challenger to be able to complete its first foiling gybe. It’s really encouraging to see them climb such a mountain in such a short time and if one is to believe the rumors coming from San Francisco, we shouldn’t be surprised at all if they manage to beat Luna Rossa, who, according to Italian sources, are afraid of their own shadow…

The first Louis Vuitton Cup semifinal race between the Swedes and the Italians is only two days away! Don’t skip the end of the video and the “Loïck cam”!!

Comments (1)

Tags: , ,

Video: Artemis Racing Blue AC72 foils on first day of sailing

Posted on 25 July 2013 by Valencia Sailing

It didn’t take long for the brand new AC72 of the Swedish America’s Cup to foil. In just a few hours, Nathan Outterdige and his crew were blasting around the San Francisco bay. The question though is how competitive they will be on August 6th, first day of the Louis Vuitton Cup semifinals:

Comments (0)

Tags: , ,

Artemis Racing flies around San Francisco Bay on Big Blue AC72

Posted on 25 July 2013 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: America's Cup] Artemis Racing has made a spectacular debut in “Big Blue” the Swedish challenger’s second AC 72 catamaran. Sailing it for the first time on Wednesday, the team had the giant catamaran up on its foils in winds as strong as 15 knots, a tremendous accomplishment.

“Today could not have gone any better. It was a perfect day and exactly what our team needed,” said helmsman Nathan Outteridge. “We got the boat on the water and foiling and we’re happy with how it was foiling… It’s a massive tribute to all the guys who have been working so hard to get us back out there.”

While Artemis Racing had an impressive first day out, caution is the word from the team. The sailors say there is a lot to learn and test before the team is ready to join Luna Rossa and Emirates Team New Zealand on the racecourse.

The Swedish team has marked the first day of the Louis Vuitton Cup semi finals, August 6, as its target date for racing. It says any participation in one of the final Round Robin races would be an unexpected bonus.

Artemis Big Blue AC72 foiling on the first day of sailing. San Francisco, 24 July 2013. Photo copyright Sander van der Borch / Artemis Racing

“We’d like to hope August 6 is achievable,” Outteridge explained. “But we know how much work is ahead of us now and we don’t have a lot of time. This was day one for us while the other teams are on day 70 or 80, so we know we’re a long way behind, but today was a big day in terms of catching up. Each step will evolve and we’ll try to keep moving as fast as we can.”

Thursday, Artemis Racing is scheduled to race against Luna Rossa, with the Italian team expected to sail the race unopposed. Artemis Racing will inspect its boat overnight and make adjustments before deciding whether it resumes sailing tomorrow.

The schedule ahead (all starts scheduled for 12:15 pm PT)
• Thursday, July 25, Artemis Racing vs. Luna Rossa Challenge
• Saturday, July 27, Emirates Team New Zealand vs. Artemis Racing
• Sunday, July 28, Emirates Team New Zealand vs. Luna Rossa Challenge
• Tuesday, July 30, Artemis Racing vs. Emirates Team New Zealand

Artemis Big Blue AC72 foiling on the first day of sailing. San Francisco, 24 July 2013. Photo copyright Sander van der Borch / Artemis Racing

Artemis Big Blue AC72 foiling on the first day of sailing. San Francisco, 24 July 2013. Photo copyright Sander van der Borch / Artemis Racing

Artemis Big Blue AC72 foiling on the first day of sailing. San Francisco, 24 July 2013. Photo copyright Sander van der Borch / Artemis Racing

Artemis Big Blue AC72 foiling on the first day of sailing. San Francisco, 24 July 2013. Photo copyright Sander van der Borch / Artemis Racing

Artemis Big Blue AC72 foiling on the first day of sailing. San Francisco, 24 July 2013. Photo copyright Sander van der Borch / Artemis Racing

Artemis Big Blue AC72 foiling on the first day of sailing. San Francisco, 24 July 2013. Photo copyright Sander van der Borch / Artemis Racing

Comments (0)

Tags: ,

Video: Artemis Racing launch Blue AC72

Posted on 23 July 2013 by Valencia Sailing

After weeks of round-the-clock work in the Artemis base in Alameda, the brand new Blue AC72 was launched on Monday:

Comments (0)

Tags: , , ,

Artemis Racing launch Blue AC72

Posted on 22 July 2013 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Artemis Racing] Before a crowd of almost 300 members of Artemis Racing, including family and friends, the team officially launched the Blue Boat this morning during a christening ceremony.

“This is a great day for many reasons” said Torbjörn Törnqvist, owner of Artemis Racing, who spoke before the crowd. “It is the culmination of a heroic effort to put together this beautiful boat…. The shore team has put so much into this, and now for our sailing team to get out there and give her justice. I am proud to share with you this great moment.”

The Blue Boat, christened “Artemis Racing”, will now be fixed with Wing #3 and undergo the dock tune process, which will set the boat up for sailing. This mainly consists of mounting the wing and adjusting all the rigging to proper tensions and lengths. There is also an in-the-water run through of the onboard systems, including wing control, daggerboards, steering, etc.

Artemis Racing launch their Blue AC72. Alameda, 22 July 2013. Photo copyright Sander van der Borch / Artemis Racing

Artemis Racing launch their Blue AC72. Alameda, 22 July 2013. Photo copyright Sander van der Borch / Artemis Racing

Artemis Racing launch their Blue AC72. Alameda, 22 July 2013. Photo copyright Sander van der Borch / Artemis Racing

Comments (0)

Regatta charter




Yachtcharter- More than 15.000 offers!

 

Sailing Calendar