Tag Archive | "Emirates Team New Zealand"

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Three-way shoot out at the top as Oman fly the flag on British waters

Posted on 25 August 2014 by Ivan Bidzilya

[Source: Extreme Sailing Series] Cardiff Bay saved the best for last for the 11-boat Extreme 40 fleet, where Alinghi, The Wave, Muscat and J.P. Morgan BAR battled it out until the bitter end for the top positions, in one of the closest – and most exciting – three-horse fights seen in the Series, which resulted in a three way collision and three consecutive penalties too boot in the final race. You couldn’t have scripted a better final, with the three leaders leaning on each other hard as they tried to gain the upper hand and The Wave, Muscat took advantage of the tussle to sail away with the win at Act 5 presented by Land Rover – and importantly homing in on Alinghi on the overall 2014 Series leaderboard as a relieved McMillan commented: “We’re on track this season, there’s nothing more we can do that’s for sure. The competition is very tight and Alinghi have been really slick this year and have brought in some unbelievable performances. To get one over on them here kind of brings it back down by a point and if we are going to keep pushing them hard, and they do the same to us it’s going to go down to the crunch.”

That left Ben Ainslie and Morgan Larson in a straight shoot out for second, but the British skipper couldn’t break the domination of Switzerland’s Alinghi, with Larson snatching it from the grasps of J.P. Morgan BAR. Alinghi’s Olympic champion tactician Anna Tunnicliffe talked through the final race: “We were waiting for Leigh to tack and he drove us right into the boats rounding the mark and boats started coming at us head first. We ended up above the mark so we couldn’t bear away and at the same time, Ben (Ainslie) was coming round into the side of us and it all turned into a mess. All three boats were tangled on each other. It’s very frustrating, but hopefully we can learn from our mistakes, we’re still on top which is good – the damage could have been worse. We need to move on to Istanbul and refocus for that event.”

Ben Ainslie’s J.P. Morgan BAR were on fire and threatening all day, posting a steady stream of consistent results and slowly chipping away at the leading pack to put themselves in the running. Despite just missing out on second place, the team’s four-times Olympic champion skipper Ainslie was satisfied with the final position, who this week were joined by local lad, Bleddyn Mon. “It has been a great improvement to see us on the podium and great to challenge with the top teams today. It’s a big step forwards and hopefully we can continue this for the rest of the Series. Sailing with Paul Campbell-James was fantastic, he has taught us a lot about these boats and Bleddyn was a great addition, he worked incredibly hard. We are looking forward to sailing with Paul Goodison in Istanbul and as we develop further in the event.”

In traditional UK Bank Holiday style, the day started with an onslaught of rain, before the clouds lifted, the breeze picked up and the fleet played out the final races in a beautiful 15 knots of breeze, with lots of ducking and weaving, hitting top speeds of 20 knots. In a programme of eight races on the final day, Red Bull Sailing Team made a late surge with their best results of the week, including a pair of wins on the tight racecourse, to upgrade their overnight position from eighth, to fourth at the close of play. Their double Olympic champion skipper Roman Hagara commented: “We found out how to start well on the racecourse which was key. We had good boat work and were good at approaching the marks; we did almost everything right. We finished the Act in fourth so that’s a really good result for us, and looking ahead to Istanbul, we need to start the first day as we finished it here.”

A further four points back in fifth place is the Swiss Realteam – and significantly for them, a disappointing 11th place for Emirates Team New Zealand, has seen Jerome Clerc and his Swiss team leapfrog up the Series leaderboard, to third place.

The battle in the bottom half of the leaderboard was just as fierce, with only three points separating eighth placed Gazprom Team Russia to 11th placed Emirates Team New Zealand – and with Act 6, Istanbul less than three weeks away, you can bet that the there will be some stern locker room debriefs, before the teams meet again.

Cardiff has once again delivered an outstanding event, with 90,000 spectators getting front row seats to the action, as part of the Cardiff Harbour Festival. Act 6 Istanbul takes place from the 11-14 September, and with news of a local team entry in the coming days, it will be a packed startline of 12 teams, as the fleet head to the city where East meets West.

Cardiff Harbour Festival hosts Extreme Sailing Series™ Act 5 Cardiff, presented by Land Rover standings after Day 4, 33 races
Position / Team / Points
1st The Wave, Muscat (OMA) Leigh McMillan 210 points.
2nd Alinghi (SUI) Morgan Larson, 205 points.
3rd J.P. Morgan BAR (GBR) Ben Ainslie, 203 points.
4th Red Bull Sailing Team (AUT) Roman Hagara, 186 points.
5th Realteam by Realstone (SUI) Jérôme Clerc, 182 points.
6th Oman Air (OMA) Rob Greenhalgh, Ted Hackney, 175 points.
7th SAP Extreme Sailing Team (DEN) Jes Gram-Hansen, Rasmus Køstner,  174 points.
8th Gazprom Team Russia (RUS) Igor Lisovenko, 154 points.
9th Groupama sailing team (FRA) Franck Cammas, 154 points.
10th GAC Pindar (AUS) Nathan Wilmot, 153 points.
11th Emirates Team New Zealand (NZL) Dean Barker, 151 points.

Extreme Sailing Series™ 2014 overall standings
Position / Team / Points
1st Alinghi (SUI) 47 points.
2nd The Wave, Muscat (OMA) 45 points.
3rd Realteam by Realstone (SUI) 34 points.
4th Emirates Team New Zealand (NZL) 33 points.
5th J.P. Morgan BAR (GBR) 25 points.
6th Gazprom Team Russia (RUS) 22 points.
7th Red Bull Sailing Team (AUT) 20 points.
8th SAP Extreme Sailing Team (DEN) 18 points.
9th Oman Air (OMA) 16 points.
10th Groupama sailing team (FRA) 15 points.
11th GAC Pindar (AUS) 5 points.

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Emirates Team New Zealand challenges for the 35th America’s Cup

Posted on 08 August 2014 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Emirates Team New Zealand] The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron has lodged a challenge for the 35th America’s Cup.

Out-going Commodore Steve Burrett announced that the challenge would go ahead at the Squadron’s annual meeting last night.

The Squadron will be represented by Emirates Team New Zealand. Challenges must received by the defending yacht club, the Golden Gate Yacht Club, by midnight Friday, San Francisco time.

The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron has been involved with all but one New Zealand America’s Cup campaign since 1987, winning at San Diego in 1995 and successfully defending at Auckland in 2000.

Emirates Team New Zealand challenges for the 35ht America’s Cup. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Mr Burrett said: “New Zealand has a distinguished history in the America’s Cup and we expect Emirates Team New Zealand will once again make New Zealand proud, just as it has done many times in the past.

“We wish the team well and we look forward to contributing to the success of the 35th America’s Cup.”

Emirates Team New Zealand CEO Grant Dalton says the team is pleased to be able to be in a position to challenge with the confidence of being able to represent the country well. “This is the official start of a long, hard journey. We do not under-estimate the challenges ahead.

“We look forward to working with the other teams to create a great event.”

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Emirates Team New Zealand board confident the team can challenge for the America’s Cup

Posted on 25 June 2014 by Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team New Zealand Emirates Team New Zealand chairman Dr Keith Turner says the team has now reached the point where it has the confidence to mount a challenge for the 35th America’s Cup.

The team has secured sufficient private and sponsorship funding to proceed to the next stage without needing Government funding during this period.

“Now, with the assistance of long-time supporters Sir Stephen Tindall, Matteo de Nora and other private Donors and Sponsors, we are delighted to be able to say that we are funded through to late this year.”

Emirates Team New Zealand feels “confident” it can challenge for the 35th America’s Cup. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

CEO Grant Dalton said: “The team has been working towards this moment almost since the day of the last race in San Francisco.

“The funding support for the team that has coalesced over the past week means we can continue the design and engineering development, and keep racing, until main sponsorship funds begin to flow.

“To avoid falling behind the opposition, our design and engineering team has been working on the software tools they will need for the challenge.”

This week sailing team members are competing in two regattas: Dean Barker, Glenn Ashby and Chris Nicholson are at the European A Class championships in France and Olympic 49er sailors Peter Burling and Blair Tuke with Jeremy Lomas, Ray Davies and Edwin DeLaat are in Russia for the Extreme Sailing Series which starts on Thursday.

“The Protocol and the design rule has been published so we know what we are working with and we are confident we can mount a challenge that has the potential to win.

“Amendments to the Protocol have removed some of the more contentious issues. If this Protocol follows the pattern of previous Cup cycles, more amendments will follow. The so called 2 boat rule for the defender is not the problem suggested by recent media reports.”

“We now await the announcement of venue for the challengers’ preliminary series and then the venue for the challengers’ semi-finals, finals and the America’s Cup match, so that we can put the finishing touches to the team’s business plan and present it to our backers for approval.”

Entries for the 35th America’s Cup close on August 8.

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Emirates Team New Zealand: The protocol examined – realistic chance to win

Posted on 13 June 2014 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Emirates Team New Zealand] It has been a big couple of weeks in the world of the America’s Cup. The protocol, the first amendments to it and San Francisco being ruled out as a venue.

The team has spent many days going through the document line-by-line, clause-by-clause and importantly its first amendment that was published earlier this week.

We finished this process only this morning.

Yesterday Oracle announced that San Francisco was no longer being considered as the venue. We are sorry we won’t be racing there, but agree with the reported reasons for the decision which was based on factors that would have massively increased costs to competitors.

America’s Cup Protocols always advantage the defender. In our review we asked: how will each of these clauses impact on Emirates Team New Zealand’s chances of winning the 35th America’s Cup.

We found some checks and balances that are not necessarily apparent at first reading.

Our conclusion is that we can mount a competitive challenge, with a realistic chance of winning the 35th America’s Cup.

To achieve this we will have to think smarter and mobilise the knowledge and expertise of the New Zealand marine industry.

Remember the initial advantage Oracle had in the 34th America’s Cup. They had beaten Alinghi in a multihull challenge. Their trimaran had a wing sail.

Emirates Team New Zealand was a monohull sailing team. Crew had only minimal experience in multihulls. The design team had absolutely no experience of wing sails.

Oracle seemed to hold all the cards yet in San Francisco last year little New Zealand was able to give the world’s biggest economy a very big fright.

Here are some of our conclusions:

The two-boats issue

The Protocol allows the defender to build two boats; challengers only one. However, the detail of the rule shows the advantage to Oracle is not as has been widely perceived.

Here’s why:

- Oracle is allowed only minimal two-boat sailing time. The second boat cannot be launched until 30 days before the Challengers’ Qualifier series, which is not earlier than four months before the America’s Cup match and they cannot sail their two boats together until after the completion of the Qualifier series.

- Oracle can do two-boat testing while the challengers are racing their semi-finals and final, which has been the case in previous America’s Cups.

- The second boat has to be built from the same mould as the first with modifications limited to no more than 20% of the hull surface which is the same as for the Challengers.

- Oracle is required to sail their first boat in the America’s Cup final.

- Crucially they are limited to the same number of dagger boards (six one-piece dagger boards or 12 lower sections) and only two wing masts even though they will have two boats.

- Challengers will be able to train/two boat test together at either the qualifying venue or the match venue, or both if they wish, as there is no restriction of the exchange of design and performance data, which was in the past, prohibited.

Grant Dalton feels Emirates Team New Zealand has a realistic chance to win the 35th America’s Cup. Photo copyright Chris Cameron / Emirates Team New Zealand

ISAF jury sidelined

The lack of an ISAF (International Sailing Federation) appointed independent jury has been highlighted. This was to be replaced by a three-man arbitration panel with panel members to be appointed by the Golden Gate Yacht Club and the Challenger of record.

This week’s amendment changes that to a fairer system: The chairman is to be appointed jointly by the GGYC and the COR from the Court of Arbitration for Sport list of arbitrators. The second member of the panel is to be appointed by the Competitor Forum (ie all competitors with one vote each) and the first two appointed arbitrators decide the third member.

When Team New Zealand defended the Cup in 2000 and 2003 an arbitration panel was used. Emirates Team New Zealand is satisfied that this is a fair appointment procedure.

The amendment also changes the manner in which crucial decisions are made in relation to the appointment of regatta officials and the management/budgeting of the regatta official’s fund which uses entry fees to pay regatta operation costs.

In the initial protocol the Defender and the Challenger of Record made these decisions jointly. Competitor Forum made up of all the teams will now make them. Each team will have one vote.

The level of fines able to be imposed by the Arbitration Panel will now be decided solely by the panel rather than by the Defender and Challenger of Record together.

These changes in the Protocol amendment represent significant concessions with the Defender agreeing to reduce the controls it can have over challenging teams.

The 35th America’s Cup is not yet sanctioned by ISAF but the regatta director is empowered to negotiate for this. We are confident that, as in the past, it will be an ISAF-sanctioned event and we expect that, like 2000 and 2003, ISAF-certified umpires and jury members will adjudicate on all on-the-water and racing-rule issues.

Timing of entry fees

This team has raised the issue of up-front entry fees and the performance bond being required before the venue is known which is a major issue for commercial teams.

The intent seems to be to avoid the situation that arose leading up to 2013 when several challengers that competed in the preliminary AC45 regattas were not financially strong enough to mount a campaign for the Cup itself. This meant the host city’s expectations on team numbers were not met.

Requiring such high entry fees and the performance bond all by December 1 2014 without the venue being known is a cash-flow problem for commercial teams rather than materially affecting their ability to win the event.

Permission to sail in other events

A clause in this week’s Protocol amendment covering permission to sail in other events corrected an ambiguous clause. As originally written it could have been interpreted to mean sailing team members had to get permission to sail in events outside the America’s Cup. The wording also required a challenger yacht club to ask for permission to conduct its own regattas. These consequences appear to have been unintended and the Protocol amendment resolves this issue.

Nationality rule

The nationality rule for crew has been somewhat harshly described as “token”. Whilst the quota is not as high as we would like to see, it is a start and a good precedent for further refinement in the future.

AC62 Class Rule

Since the publication of the Protocol, the AC62 Class Rule has also been released. A draft had been previously circulated to all prospective teams for comment. We are pleased to see that comments made by Emirates Team New Zealand were dealt with in adjustments made to the final version.

Conclusion

The release of the Protocol and the subsequent amendment, the release of the final AC62 Class Rule and the elimination of San Francisco as a possible venue give the team something to work with. Leading up to the 2013 match the Protocol was amended 19 times, the final time on September 2, 2013, just days before Emirates Team New Zealand faced off against Oracle.

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Video: Grant Dalton addresses the 35th America’s Cup Protocol in press conference

Posted on 13 June 2014 by Valencia Sailing

Full video of the press conference given by Grant Dalton on Friday, courtesy of Sail-World’s Richard Gladwell:

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Emirates Team NZ unable to fund a Volvo Ocean Race campaign; should we worry?

Posted on 07 May 2014 by Valencia Sailing

A little bit over two months ago, thanks to Spain’s top sailing journalist Nicolas Terry, we revealed that Emirates Team New Zealand and Team Campos had come into an agreement to join forces in order to enter the 2014-15 Volvo Ocean Race. Although initially denied by both parts, Grant Dalton later confirmed the existence of the joint-venture.

Time passed by without any additional information coming, either from New Zealand or from Spain, until last week, when Emirates Team New Zealand issued a statement where it renounced from participating in the round-the-world race. According to Grant Dalton, the team was not convinced it could mount a successful challenge in the time available and the team’s energies would be better directed towards the next America’s Cup. With the start of the race in Alicante just five months away, timing was too tight.

Of course, what Dalton didn’t mention in the press release was that time was running out because the Kiwi-Spanish joint-venture wasn’t as successful as initially thought in their fundraising campaign. Talks with the Spanish and, allegedly, Russians sponsors were dragging on and it probably became apparent there wouldn’t be any deal in the near future.

We will probably never know the reasons why the Spanish-Kiwi alliance never came to fruition. According to some Spanish sources there were serious discrepancies in what regards the management of the future team. That might be true or not but it is irrelevant.

The real issue in our opinion is that neither Team New Zealand nor Team Campos were able, on a standalone basis, to secure the necessary funding in order to mount a competitive team. They were forced to seek an alliance and pull their forces together.

Conventional wisdom wants the minimum amount required to have a shot at winning the race to be about €15 million. As a result, neither Grant Dalton nor Pedro Campos were able to convince a couple of global, multinational groups that it was worth investing about €7-8 million each towards an entry in what is considered to be the premier round-the-world sailing race.

The question we are asking here is whether this is a worrisome sign, for the race in particular but also sailing in general. Should we worry when the world’s best sailing team and organization, Team New Zealand, is unable find half of what the top European football players earn in a year?

Is it a problem of the Volvo Ocean Race? It is true that costs have been substantially reduced but maybe sponsors find that even at those levels the return just isn’t there to justify the investment. It is true that €15 million is half of the €30 million Ericsson paid for a two-boat campaign in 2008 but it is still a lot of money!

Or is it a problem of our sport? Has sailing lost its allure within the marketing departments around the world? The 34th America’s Cup last year failed as well to attract any major, global sponsor, either for the organization or the teams, with the possible exception of Team New Zealand’s naming sponsor, Emirates. Even in smaller boats, the business model of the 1990′s and 2000′s doesn’t seem to stand any longer and we are gradually but steadily moving back to the wealthy-owner model.

Should we worry about the sport of sailing? If yes, what is the solution? I wish I knew because if I did, I would be selling it in Alicante, San Francisco and all the headquarters of the major sailing events!

Auckland will not have a home team this time in the Volvo Ocean Race. Photo copyright Chris Cameron / Camper

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Emirates Team New Zealand drops plans of Volvo Ocean Race entry

Posted on 02 May 2014 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Emirates Team New Zealand] Emirates Team New Zealand announced today that it would not be competing in the next Volvo Ocean Race.

In recent weeks, the team had explored a joint challenge with Spanish interests. The Volvo Ocean race starts at Alicante, Spain, on October 4 this year.

Grant Dalton said the team was not convinced it could mount a successful challenge in the time available and the team’s energies would be better directed towards the next America’s Cup.

Dalton said the team had worked hard with excellent people representing the Spanish interests and with the Volvo Ocean Race management to get an entry to the start line.

“In the end, time was against us. Every passing day magnified the impact that preparations for a round-the-world race would have on Emirates Team New Zealand’s other operations.

“The team exists to win the America’s Cup. With the imminent announcement of the Protocol for the 35th America’s Cup, it’s time for us to withdraw reluctantly from any consideration of participation in the Volvo Ocean race.”

The Extreme Sailing Series will be the only official racing Emirates Team New Zealand does in 2014 as they drop their plans to take part in the Volvo Ocean Race. Photo copyright Chris Cameron / Emirates Team New Zealand

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New board named for Emirates Team New Zealand

Posted on 07 April 2014 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Emirates Team New Zealand] Retiring chairman of Emirates Team New Zealand Gary Paykel has announced the formation of a new five-member board of directors to govern Emirates Team New Zealand.

He said he had consulted widely to assemble a board made up of passionate New Zealanders with a range of skills and in-depth experience in many areas of New Zealand business and technology as well as past experience with the team and the America’s Cup.

Mr Paykel said Dr Keith Turner, a former chief executive and experienced company director, would chair the board.

The board’s immediate tasks are to review the Protocol (the document which governs the conduct of the America’s Cup), assess the possibility of mounting a credible challenge from New Zealand and prepare a business case for the Government. Oracle, the defender of the America’s Cup, is expected to make the Protocol public within the next few days.

“This is a strong group of directors who will work closely with all stakeholders, including the government, as we make an assessment of mounting a challenge in 2017,” Dr Turner said.

“Should the Board determine that a challenge is credible, I expect the Government will then decide whether to invest in a challenge and if so, seek a further appointment to the board.”

While details of the management structure and the operating model will be worked through as part of preparing the business case for any challenge, Grant Dalton will assume the position of CEO, reporting to the Board.

The board met for the first time today (Monday April 7).

Chair, Dr Keith Turner

Dr Turner is an experienced professional director. He is currently the chairman of Fisher & Paykel Appliances Limited, deputy chairman of Auckland International Airport, and a director of Chorus. In Australia he is a director of ASX listed Spark Infrastructure Ltd. As part of his Spark responsibilities he is a director of South Australia Power Networks and Victoria Power Networks.

He is a former chair of Solar City Limited and has significant experience with small, technology start-up ventures.

Dr Turner has extensive experience in the energy sector, most recently as chief executive officer of Meridian Energy Limited from 1999 to 2008. Prior to that, he worked as a private energy consultant advising a range of large corporate clients and Government.

Dr Turner has a practical bent, having built an 11.5m cruising yacht and a 250sq m replica colonial home. He is now based in Tauranga.

Emirates Team New Zealand’s new board will assess whether a credible challenge can be mounted under the rules Russell Coutts and Larry Ellison are set to present soon. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / www.vsail.info

Director, Sir Stephen Tindall

Businessman, philanthropist and investor Sir Stephen Tindall, founder and director of the Warehouse Group, has had a long association with Emirates Team New Zealand.

As an investor in New Zealand enterprises, he has made substantial investments through K1W1 and other vehicles as seed and venture capital into a large number of start-up and early stage businesses from biotech, environmental technology, electronics, high tech, software and other businesses with high export potential.

Sir Stephen and his wife Lady Margaret established the Tindall Foundation to focus New Zealand on improving the performance of families and social services; supporting community-based initiatives that create employment and encourage enterprise; supporting the environment and preserving biodiversity; promoting generosity and giving.

In 2009, he was made a Knight Companion of the NZ Order of Merit, 2007 Distinguished Companion of the NZ Order of Merit; 2006 The Sir Peter Blake Leadership Medal.

Director, Greg Horton

Greg Horton is one of the founding directors of Harmos Horton Lusk, an Auckland-based specialist corporate legal advisory firm.

In his legal practice, he specialises in M&A transactions (public and private),takeovers, corporate law, governance, strategic and board advice and also structures and advice for high net worth families.

He is a director of Fulton Hogan Limited, New Zealand Funds Management Limited and Tappenden Holdings Limited, and is a trustee, director and investment committee member of a number of other entities.

Director, Tina Symmans

Tina Symmans has more than 25 years’ experience in advising companie smost particularly in the fields of strategic communications and corporate and government relations.

Tina operates her own practice and has had significant experience and connectivity with the corporate sector and government.

She is a director of Forsyth Barr, a member of the Takeovers Panel and chairs Williams Warn, a private company. Tina was previously a director of PSIS (Co-operative Bank) and Turners & Growers.

Prior to 2012 Tina was a member of the senior management team at Telecom as director of corporate relations and was on the team that ran the successful demerger program forming Telecom and Chorus.

Director, Bob Field

Bob Field recently retired from a successful career in the international motor industry, including 30 years as managing director and chair of Toyota New Zealand.

He has a strong record of governance with national organisations involved in conservation, road safety and best business practice.

Former roles include chair of the NZ Business Council for Sustainable Development, Chair of WWF and president of the Motor Industry Association.

Current roles include chair of CMD Nominees and directorships of Kiwirail and NZRU.Bob has been closely involved with Team New Zealand for 25 years and six successive Americas Cup campaigns as a sponsor, an advisor and a mentor for the team.

- See more at: http://etnzblog.com/#!2014/04/new-board-named-for-etnz

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