Archive | Team Russia

Team Russia will sail to St Petersburg but will not compete

Posted on 24 June 2009 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Volvo Ocean Race] Team Russia will sail with the fleet to St Petersburg but will not be a formal part of the racing proceedings after being unable to overcome their rule compliance issues.

The team, led by Stig Westergaard, arrived in Stockholm yesterday after last being seen in Singapore at Christmas, where they suspended racing because of insufficient funds.

Westergaard has spent the last six months trying to get the boat back in the race, but, despite reaching the leg 10 start port, acknowledged yesterday that he faced an enormous task to bring the boat and crew back in line with the class and race rules by the Thursday restart.

Ultimately, the scale of the operation was too large and the boat, which was in need of much maintenance after six months inactivity, was unable to comply with the all of the regulations.

Team Russia skipper Stig Westergaard with owner and bowman Oleg Zherebtsov. Stockholm, 24 June 2009. Photo copyright Rick Tomlinson / Volvo Ocean Race

The team will now join the fleet on the 400-nautical mile trip to St Petersburg, where Westergaard believes it belongs.

“We all owe it to Russia to come back to St Petersburg and show the flag,” he said.

Team founder Oleg Zherebtsov added: “We have put a tremendous amount of work into bringing Kosatka to Stockholm in race-ready mode and compliant with the event’s rules with the aim of racing for the first time into Russian waters. Regrettably we realise there are too many issues to overcome.

“Our intentions are go to the start line together with the other seven yachts competing in the Volvo Ocean Race from where we will shadow the fleet in racing mode all the way to the finish line and to the final mooring spot with all other VOR yachts in front of St Peter and St Paul Island.”

In explaining the decision, Race Director Jack Lloyd said: “We were thinking that they might make it this morning. They had one measurement issue that was weighing the boat, which we were looking about taking it to the Jury, but hadn’t made up our mind. Then we found another issue when the guys started checking the boat. There’s a safety mechanism on the keel canting system; you need a button that you can press that will mechanically put the keel back in the centre. If you are pinned down by the keel, you can mechanically crank it back up to the middle and help get the boat up.

“We have been strong all along that we will not compromise on safety and this is a safety aspect. We could maybe request something from the jury on a measurement issue, but we cannot do that with safety. It is impossible for them to get it done so we can’t go to the jury so they cannot race.

“But they are still part of our race. They deserve to take their place at the finish.”

Westergaard added: “We have run out of time. We put our guts into this and we knew it was going to be hard. We went for it and we basically didn’t have enough time to get the boat into race mode.

“We want to see if we can beat the other guys anyhow. We will be starting just after the other boats and seeing if we can catch them up.”

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Team Russia will sail to St Petersburg but will not compete

Posted on 24 June 2009 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Volvo Ocean Race] Team Russia will sail with the fleet to St Petersburg but will not be a formal part of the racing proceedings after being unable to overcome their rule compliance issues.

The team, led by Stig Westergaard, arrived in Stockholm yesterday after last being seen in Singapore at Christmas, where they suspended racing because of insufficient funds.

Westergaard has spent the last six months trying to get the boat back in the race, but, despite reaching the leg 10 start port, acknowledged yesterday that he faced an enormous task to bring the boat and crew back in line with the class and race rules by the Thursday restart.

Ultimately, the scale of the operation was too large and the boat, which was in need of much maintenance after six months inactivity, was unable to comply with the all of the regulations.

Team Russia skipper Stig Westergaard with owner and bowman Oleg Zherebtsov. Stockholm, 24 June 2009. Photo copyright Rick Tomlinson / Volvo Ocean Race

The team will now join the fleet on the 400-nautical mile trip to St Petersburg, where Westergaard believes it belongs.

“We all owe it to Russia to come back to St Petersburg and show the flag,” he said.

Team founder Oleg Zherebtsov added: “We have put a tremendous amount of work into bringing Kosatka to Stockholm in race-ready mode and compliant with the event’s rules with the aim of racing for the first time into Russian waters. Regrettably we realise there are too many issues to overcome.

“Our intentions are go to the start line together with the other seven yachts competing in the Volvo Ocean Race from where we will shadow the fleet in racing mode all the way to the finish line and to the final mooring spot with all other VOR yachts in front of St Peter and St Paul Island.”

In explaining the decision, Race Director Jack Lloyd said: “We were thinking that they might make it this morning. They had one measurement issue that was weighing the boat, which we were looking about taking it to the Jury, but hadn’t made up our mind. Then we found another issue when the guys started checking the boat. There’s a safety mechanism on the keel canting system; you need a button that you can press that will mechanically put the keel back in the centre. If you are pinned down by the keel, you can mechanically crank it back up to the middle and help get the boat up.

“We have been strong all along that we will not compromise on safety and this is a safety aspect. We could maybe request something from the jury on a measurement issue, but we cannot do that with safety. It is impossible for them to get it done so we can’t go to the jury so they cannot race.

“But they are still part of our race. They deserve to take their place at the finish.”

Westergaard added: “We have run out of time. We put our guts into this and we knew it was going to be hard. We went for it and we basically didn’t have enough time to get the boat into race mode.

“We want to see if we can beat the other guys anyhow. We will be starting just after the other boats and seeing if we can catch them up.”

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Team Russia intent to race in last Volvo Ocean Race leg

Posted on 22 June 2009 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Volvo Ocean Race] A familiar face is on the horizon. Team Russia are on their way to Stockholm with the intention of taking part in the leg 10 sprint to their home port of St Petersburg, Russia.

The team suspended racing in Singapore after leg three as a consequence of insufficient funds, and have since been trying to source funding to resume.

In the meantime, they have largely changed their management and crew – Stig Westergaard has taken over from Andreas Hanakamp as skipper and, along with founder Oleg Zherebtsov, is the only returning member of the sailing team – and they now face a difficult task in being declared eligible to race.

Race Director Jack Lloyd said: “We haven’t seen the boat since Christmas time when they left Singapore so we have no idea of the state of the electronics or the measurement condition of the boat. She just has to comply with the rules, like any other boat. All other boats have to maintain the boat in measurement trim and their crew have to qualify. They just have to go through that process.

“Their old crew has disbanded so probably about eight of them – if they want to take a full crew – have to take a safety course. We have got to do medicals and a little bit of other training, plus we have to get the boat back into measurement trim and get all the electronics done.”

It amounts to a race against time for the team, who are currently at sea en route from Gothenburg and expect to be in Stockholm by Tuesday afternoon or evening. The leg 10 start is on Thursday.

Lloyd added: “There’s an outside chance that they will make it and I think we will have to put an application to the jury for them to race just under their measurement certificate and that’s the only thing that’s negotiable really. It could be that they will start with some penalty.”

Under the race rules, a team can suspend racing and return provided they meet the set criteria that govern the event. The practice is most usually used during a leg, whereby a team can receive outside assistance to help effect repairs in return for a time penalty (all the teams except Ericsson 4 and PUMA have taken this option at one stage or other during the race so far).

Westergaard is excited to be back. “Everyone on the team had a feeling that we had unfinished business. We all felt like we stopped in a way that none of us was really satisfied with. I think closing the door in St Petersburg is the right way to finish off Team Russia.”

If Team Russia are deemed eligible to return, it could, in a tenuous sense, have an implication on the one remaining leaderboard battle. Second-placed PUMA currently lead Telefonica Blue by 6.5 points which, in the absence of Team Russia, would be enough to cement the position even if they finished last (seventh) on leg 10, collected two points and Blue won. If it is an eight-boat fleet, however, PUMA would only collect one point for finishing last or failing to finish while Blue could pip them by scooping the maximum haul of eight points. Blue have already learnt the hard way that anything can happen.

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Team Russia intent to race in last Volvo Ocean Race leg

Posted on 22 June 2009 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Volvo Ocean Race] A familiar face is on the horizon. Team Russia are on their way to Stockholm with the intention of taking part in the leg 10 sprint to their home port of St Petersburg, Russia.

The team suspended racing in Singapore after leg three as a consequence of insufficient funds, and have since been trying to source funding to resume.

In the meantime, they have largely changed their management and crew – Stig Westergaard has taken over from Andreas Hanakamp as skipper and, along with founder Oleg Zherebtsov, is the only returning member of the sailing team – and they now face a difficult task in being declared eligible to race.

Race Director Jack Lloyd said: “We haven’t seen the boat since Christmas time when they left Singapore so we have no idea of the state of the electronics or the measurement condition of the boat. She just has to comply with the rules, like any other boat. All other boats have to maintain the boat in measurement trim and their crew have to qualify. They just have to go through that process.

“Their old crew has disbanded so probably about eight of them – if they want to take a full crew – have to take a safety course. We have got to do medicals and a little bit of other training, plus we have to get the boat back into measurement trim and get all the electronics done.”

It amounts to a race against time for the team, who are currently at sea en route from Gothenburg and expect to be in Stockholm by Tuesday afternoon or evening. The leg 10 start is on Thursday.

Lloyd added: “There’s an outside chance that they will make it and I think we will have to put an application to the jury for them to race just under their measurement certificate and that’s the only thing that’s negotiable really. It could be that they will start with some penalty.”

Under the race rules, a team can suspend racing and return provided they meet the set criteria that govern the event. The practice is most usually used during a leg, whereby a team can receive outside assistance to help effect repairs in return for a time penalty (all the teams except Ericsson 4 and PUMA have taken this option at one stage or other during the race so far).

Westergaard is excited to be back. “Everyone on the team had a feeling that we had unfinished business. We all felt like we stopped in a way that none of us was really satisfied with. I think closing the door in St Petersburg is the right way to finish off Team Russia.”

If Team Russia are deemed eligible to return, it could, in a tenuous sense, have an implication on the one remaining leaderboard battle. Second-placed PUMA currently lead Telefonica Blue by 6.5 points which, in the absence of Team Russia, would be enough to cement the position even if they finished last (seventh) on leg 10, collected two points and Blue won. If it is an eight-boat fleet, however, PUMA would only collect one point for finishing last or failing to finish while Blue could pip them by scooping the maximum haul of eight points. Blue have already learnt the hard way that anything can happen.

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Team Russia drops out of the Volvo Ocean Race due to insufficient funds

Posted on 23 December 2008 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Team Russia] Team Russia today announced it has suspended racing upon arrival in Singapore at the end of Leg 3 of the Volvo Ocean Race due to insufficient funds to continue the campaign.

The team has been actively approaching sponsors in recent months to secure enough financial support to continue the Volvo Ocean Race onto Qingdao (China) and beyond. However no sponsorship has been forthcoming and the team has no alternative but to suspend racing until further financial support can be secured.

Team Russia arrives in Singapore, the end of their journey in the Volvo Ocean Race. Singapore, 23 December 2008. Photo copyright David Kneale / Volvo Ocean Race

“From the outset, it was always a goal to bring commercial partners into the project,” explains Oleg Zherebtsov, the Team principal. “Until now, I have financed the team with my own money, in advance of anticipated sponsorship funding. By this stage in the Volvo campaign we had intended to find sponsorship, but this process has been impacted by the global economic situation.”

Cessation of racing also means that Team Russia is unable to continue its partnership with the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society (WDCS). The team was proud to “Sail For The Whale”, during the first three legs of the Volvo Ocean Race and was instrumental in spreading the call for safe habitats for whales and dolphins around the globe. WDCS is very proud to have been a part of this race and will continue to work for the creation of 12 large marine protection areas by the year 2012 and will find new ways to work with the international sailing community as well as the general public to achieve this goal.

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Team Russia drops out of the Volvo Ocean Race due to insufficient funds

Posted on 23 December 2008 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Team Russia] Team Russia today announced it has suspended racing upon arrival in Singapore at the end of Leg 3 of the Volvo Ocean Race due to insufficient funds to continue the campaign.

The team has been actively approaching sponsors in recent months to secure enough financial support to continue the Volvo Ocean Race onto Qingdao (China) and beyond. However no sponsorship has been forthcoming and the team has no alternative but to suspend racing until further financial support can be secured.

Team Russia arrives in Singapore, the end of their journey in the Volvo Ocean Race. Singapore, 23 December 2008. Photo copyright David Kneale / Volvo Ocean Race

“From the outset, it was always a goal to bring commercial partners into the project,” explains Oleg Zherebtsov, the Team principal. “Until now, I have financed the team with my own money, in advance of anticipated sponsorship funding. By this stage in the Volvo campaign we had intended to find sponsorship, but this process has been impacted by the global economic situation.”

Cessation of racing also means that Team Russia is unable to continue its partnership with the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society (WDCS). The team was proud to “Sail For The Whale”, during the first three legs of the Volvo Ocean Race and was instrumental in spreading the call for safe habitats for whales and dolphins around the globe. WDCS is very proud to have been a part of this race and will continue to work for the creation of 12 large marine protection areas by the year 2012 and will find new ways to work with the international sailing community as well as the general public to achieve this goal.

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Team Russia arrives in Cochin

Posted on 03 December 2008 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Volvo Ocean Race] Andreas Hanakamp and his men onboard Kosatka Team Russia finally made it to the finish of leg two of the Volvo Ocean Race in Cochin when they crossed the line at 1323 GMT (1853 local time), after being at sea for 18 days, 2 hours 3 minutes and 30 seconds (elapsed time 18:02:03:30).

They were treated to a raucous welcome onshore as their arrival happened to coincide with the inauguration of the race village in Cochin. Thousands turned out to cheer the eighth place finisher.

Team Russia gets caught in the fishing nets, part 1. 1 December 2008. Video copyright Team Russia

Team Russia skipper Andreas Hanakamp/AUT was in good spirits as the boat pulled alongside the pontoon, and philosophical about their leg:

“It’s been up and down. It was our conditions in the Southern Ocean and we felt really comfortable there, we had a lot of fun and kept pushing hard. The first transition zone I don’t think we got it perfect and then we had this meeting where we decided to go to the east, which made a lot of sense at the time, so we sacrificed 100 miles there in the hope we’d gain a couple of hundred miles, but…well, you know what happened. We risked, we went for it, and it didn’t work – that’s sailing.”

The team principal and bowman, Oleg Zherebtsov, had his first taste of the Volvo Ocean Race on this leg to Cochin and was in very good form as he stepped off the boat.

Team Russia gets caught in the fishing nets, part 2. 1 December 2008. Video copyright Team Russia

“I’m happy, happy, happy! It’s a very extreme feeling,” he said. “I can’t really describe it, we’ve been in such different conditions from the Southern Ocean with the cold and wind to the hot, +30-degrees and the Doldrums, no wind, and before that wind up to 40 knots and the Chinese gybe and then catching the fishing net…It’s such a powerful experience and after three weeks on the water to see all these people, it’s really amazing.”

Team Russia was slow out of Cape Town, but was soon back in the thick of things. Then, the team suffered their first real heavy-air broach on day four of the 19-day leg, but luckily did no damage to the boat. Hanakamp said yesterday that the boat is in remarkably good order thanks to the solid construction by Green Marine in Lymington, UK.

They made a good showing at the scoring gate, crossing in fourth place to earn 2.5 points, but it was when the team made the calculated decision to head east around the Doldrums that things started to go wrong. Out on the eastern flank of the fleet, the Kosatka crew had opted to sail a longer route with the promise of more wind, which did not materialise, leaving them wallowing in the calms, while the rest of the crews were reaching in the tradewinds towards Cochin.

As a final insult, the team became entangled in an unlit fishing net on Monday night, which required them to lower the sails and stop the boat for upwards of two hours as the crew set about freeing themselves. But despite the setbacks, morale onboard remained good and spirits high as the team approached the finish.

Leg three of the Volvo Ocean Race, 1950 nm from Cochin to Singapore starts on Saturday 13 December at 1400 local time (0830 GMT).

Team Russia gets caught in the fishing nets, part 3. 1 December 2008. Video copyright Team Russia

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Team Russia arrives in Cochin

Posted on 03 December 2008 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Volvo Ocean Race] Andreas Hanakamp and his men onboard Kosatka Team Russia finally made it to the finish of leg two of the Volvo Ocean Race in Cochin when they crossed the line at 1323 GMT (1853 local time), after being at sea for 18 days, 2 hours 3 minutes and 30 seconds (elapsed time 18:02:03:30).

They were treated to a raucous welcome onshore as their arrival happened to coincide with the inauguration of the race village in Cochin. Thousands turned out to cheer the eighth place finisher.

Team Russia gets caught in the fishing nets, part 1. 1 December 2008. Video copyright Team Russia

Team Russia skipper Andreas Hanakamp/AUT was in good spirits as the boat pulled alongside the pontoon, and philosophical about their leg:

“It’s been up and down. It was our conditions in the Southern Ocean and we felt really comfortable there, we had a lot of fun and kept pushing hard. The first transition zone I don’t think we got it perfect and then we had this meeting where we decided to go to the east, which made a lot of sense at the time, so we sacrificed 100 miles there in the hope we’d gain a couple of hundred miles, but…well, you know what happened. We risked, we went for it, and it didn’t work – that’s sailing.”

The team principal and bowman, Oleg Zherebtsov, had his first taste of the Volvo Ocean Race on this leg to Cochin and was in very good form as he stepped off the boat.

Team Russia gets caught in the fishing nets, part 2. 1 December 2008. Video copyright Team Russia

“I’m happy, happy, happy! It’s a very extreme feeling,” he said. “I can’t really describe it, we’ve been in such different conditions from the Southern Ocean with the cold and wind to the hot, +30-degrees and the Doldrums, no wind, and before that wind up to 40 knots and the Chinese gybe and then catching the fishing net…It’s such a powerful experience and after three weeks on the water to see all these people, it’s really amazing.”

Team Russia was slow out of Cape Town, but was soon back in the thick of things. Then, the team suffered their first real heavy-air broach on day four of the 19-day leg, but luckily did no damage to the boat. Hanakamp said yesterday that the boat is in remarkably good order thanks to the solid construction by Green Marine in Lymington, UK.

They made a good showing at the scoring gate, crossing in fourth place to earn 2.5 points, but it was when the team made the calculated decision to head east around the Doldrums that things started to go wrong. Out on the eastern flank of the fleet, the Kosatka crew had opted to sail a longer route with the promise of more wind, which did not materialise, leaving them wallowing in the calms, while the rest of the crews were reaching in the tradewinds towards Cochin.

As a final insult, the team became entangled in an unlit fishing net on Monday night, which required them to lower the sails and stop the boat for upwards of two hours as the crew set about freeing themselves. But despite the setbacks, morale onboard remained good and spirits high as the team approached the finish.

Leg three of the Volvo Ocean Race, 1950 nm from Cochin to Singapore starts on Saturday 13 December at 1400 local time (0830 GMT).

Team Russia gets caught in the fishing nets, part 3. 1 December 2008. Video copyright Team Russia

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