Archive | Rolex Sydney Hobart

New super maxis gear up for Rolex Sydney Hobart

Posted on 21 October 2014 by Ivan Bidzilya

[Source: RSHYR] While Syd Fischer continues to prepare his super maxi Ragamuffin 100 for the Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race after the new hull was delivered 19 days ago, American Jim Clark has launched his colourful new Comanche in the USA and trials are underway.

The 70th running of the Cruising Yacht Club of Australia’s annual race is living up to expectation with 98 high-calibre entries received so far, from Sean Langman’s 1932 built Maluka of Kermandie, the oldest and smallest boat at 9 metres, to the super maxis. The most talked about boat though, is the Verdier Yacht Design & Vplp 100 footer, Comanche.

Built at Hodgdon Yachts in Maine, and designed to break records, Comanche was sailed for the first time on October 13, and will be spiced with Australian flavour come the 628 nautical mile race in December; partly because her co-owner is Kristy Hinze-Clark, a former super model from Australia married to Jim Clark.

Her mainsail also reflects Comanche’s Australian connection, as does Aussie crew; boat captain Casey Smith, Ryan Godfrey in the pit and Chris Maxted ‘floating’.

“Crew for this race is finalised,” says skipper, Kenny Read. “As there is such a small window to work the boat, any good skipper knows the best thing is to surround yourself with people you know and trust. They’re people I’ve done a million miles with,” he says of other big names in navigator Stan Honey and New Zealand’s Kevin Halrap on tactics.

“We leave early next week for Charleston to put the boat on a ship – next stop Sydney. We look forward to seeing you all down there,” says Read, a world champion sailor of Volvo Ocean Race fame.

Jim Clark, an American entrepreneur and computer scientist, founded several prominent Silicon Valley technology companies, such as Silicon Graphics Inc. and Netscape Communications Corporation. He says: “I’m certainly excited about Comanche’s potential to do what it was designed to do – break some speed records.”

Clark has some reservations though. “It was not designed for the Sydney Hobart, which is an unusual race, especially in the past few years, as it’s turned into a lighter air downwind race. In those sorts of conditions, I’d say Comanche is unlikely to have any commanding advantage.

“In many other conditions, I think Comanche should do pretty well. However, the boat and crew will have had only a couple of weeks on the water before we ship it to Australia. There’s a lot of work to do before the race start. In the short term, I don’t have high expectations, but in the long term, I think this boat could really set a mark.”

Ken Read is excited about the prospect of racing the yacht. Asked how it felt to sail a boat designed to push the boundaries of technology and to aim for line honours in all of the world’s major races, he said: “We’ve only been out a few times, but I’m very excited to sail Comanche. It’s an amazing boat that very quickly earns your respect.

“Working out how we unleash the potential without breaking anything is going to be a steep learning curve for us all, and that transfers to the race as well. We need to be going at full throttle, but we also need to work out her limits.”

Of their competition for the upcoming Rolex Sydney Hobart, their first major race, Read conceded, “The other maxis are all tried and tested in this race, so we’ve a lot of catching up to do – I’m as anxious to see the results as anybody. We have to keep remembering there is a three-year schedule for this boat and this is just the beginning.”

Ragamuffin 100’s owner, Syd Fischer, is not overly concerned about Comanche or his other line honours rivals. At Friday night’s Australian Yachting Awards, where he received the coveted Yachting Australia President’s Award, Fischer said: “I’m happy with the boat I’ve got on the way and I’m looking forward to racing the other 100 footers.”

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50 entries and counting for Rolex Sydney Hobart

Posted on 03 September 2014 by Ivan Bidzilya

[Source: Rolex Sydney Hobart] It’s all about the numbers for this year’s Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race, with entries in the 70th edition of the Cruising Yacht Club of Australia’s blue water classic swelling to 50, including classic yachts such as Love & War and the high-tech flying machines like Ichi Ban.

Noel Sneddon’s Vickers 41 C.Q.R IT Inca (pronounced secure it) was the 50th entrant to be received by the CYCA. The sturdy workhorse from the ACT also serves as Sneddon’s home and spends most of her time in Airlie Beach.

The 2014 fleet showcases the cream of Australian yachting and an ever growing number of international entries that will traverse the globe just to reach the Sydney Harbour start line this Boxing Day.

Yachting Australia President and Past CYCA Commodore Matt Allen worked with the Carkeek team to ensure his latest 60 foot Ichi Ban, was at the cutting edge of yacht racing design when he launched the boat just 10 months ago. Since then, Ichi Ban was declared overall winner and claimed line honours in the CYCA’s Sydney Newcastle Race and finished second at Airlie Beach Race Week.

Allen will be competing in his 25th Sydney Hobart, joining 116 yachties who have achieved this milestone, including 12 who have completed 40 plus Hobarts.

Other notable entries include Tony Kirby’s year-old Patrice, which made a big impression winning the Sydney Short Ocean Racing Championship, then reeled of second places at the Festival of Sails, Sail Port Stephens and the Audi IRC Australian Championship. In August, the Ker 46 won six from six races at Airlie Beach Race Week.

Roger Hickman’s 29 year-old Farr 43 Wild Rose, the 1993 overall IOR winner and reigning Blue Water Pointscore champion always performs, and John Newbold’s Primitive Cool from Victoria is worth watching. The Reichel Pugh 51 won the 2010 race as Secret Men’s Business 3.5 for original owner, Geoff Boettcher.

Heading the classic yacht entries are: Bacardi, Victorian Martin Power’s Peterson 44, which last year sailed her 28th race to record the most Sydney Hobarts by a yacht; Maluka of Kermandie, Sean Langman’s classic gaff-rigger will be the oldest and smallest yacht to compete and Love & War, Simon Kurts’ S & S 47, one of only two yachts to win three times overall in the history of the race.

A strong contingent is building from interstate. Victorian entries are at 15, Tasmania can boast six, Western Australia has five, while Queensland numbers four.

Two international entries have been received; Caro, Mark Bertlett’s Botin 60 from the Cayman Islands, and Passion 4 C, Stefan Lehnert’s Tripp 56 from Germany. Entries are also expected from New Zealand, Hong Kong, USA and United Kingdom.

As a nod to the race’s founding fathers, the CYCA has extended an invitation to those yachts that have competed in previous Sydney Hobarts to participate in a Parade of Sail, which will commence at 10am on 26 December.

Participants will motor-sail a short Harbour course led by the historic naval vessel HMAS Advance. Competitors from the early years of the race such as Kathleen Gillett, Archina, Wayfarer, Christina and Defiance have already signaled their intentions to be part of this historic event.

CYCA Commodore John Cameron announced the commemorative Parade of Sail would be conducted in keeping with the Club’s ongoing tradition of celebrating key anniversaries of the Race.

“The 70th Sydney Hobart Yacht Race is a significant milestone and what better way to pay tribute to the sport of ocean racing than conducting a Parade of Sail featuring veteran yachts from the great races south to Hobart.

“We trust that the Parade of Sail will be a perfect curtain-raiser to the main event, which could see up to 120 yachts take to the start line on Boxing Day, December 26 at 1pm. Man and machine will battle the elements down the eastern seaboard for 628 nautical miles to see who will be crowned the overall winner of the Rolex Sydney Hobart.

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Overall Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race confirmed

Posted on 31 December 2009 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Rolex Sydney Hobart] Andy Saies’ Two True survived a protest this afternoon to be confirmed as overall winner of the Tattersall’s Cup, the major prize in the 2009 Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race for the overall IRC handicap winner.

After a two-hour hearing, the International Jury dismissed the protest entered by the Inglis 39 She’s the Culprit (Todd Leary), the Hobart yacht damaged in a crush of boats approaching the first rounding mark after the race start on Sydney Harbour.

Two True, one of the first new Farr-designed Beneteau First 40 stock production racer/cruiser to be imported into Australia, won IRC overall by 42 minutes from another new First 40, (Mike Welsh) after a close race-long duel in which they followed a similar strategy – stay well east of the rhumbline.

Ian Mason’s Sydney 38 Next, in third place, another 1hr 19min behind, was similarly pushed by close competition in the six-boat Sydney 38 fleet racing one-design, as well as on IRC handicap. Another Sydney 38, Swish (Steven Proud) from the strong Sydney fleet, was fourth and Tony Kirby’s Jeppersen X-41 Patrice Six, fifth.

Two True, overall winner of the Tattersall’s Cup. Photo copyright Rolex / Daniel Foster

In sixth place was the 2009 Rolex Fastnet Race winner Ran (Niklas Zennstrom), from the UK.

Two True, from the Cruising Yacht Club of South Australia, is the first yacht from South Australia to win the Tattersall’s Cup since Kevan Pearce’s win with SAP Ausmaid in 2000. The South Australians continue to be strongly committed to the Rolex Sydney Hobart Race, sailing 1000 nautical miles just to get to the start.

Owner-skipper Saies said he was absolutely elated at the win after being in the surreal situation of not knowing the outcome until after the protest hearing. “Obviously we are very happy with the jury’s decision. We believe we did everything in the circumstances to avoid significant damage to the other boat. We gave our intention to protest, we did a 720 (degree penalty turn), though the damage to the other boat was minor and superficial.”

“I respect the decision of the skipper of She’s the Culprit not to continue racing in those circumstances, but obviously we are very happy and delighted with the outcome.”

He thanked his crew, which raced the two prior Sydney Hobart Races on his previous boat True North, a Beneteau First 40. “The Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race cannot be won without a great team, a great boat and an ounce of Sydney Hobart luck. Our team are fabulous guys. We have worked together for the past three years on my previous boat True North.” Saies particularly thanked Brett Young, his team and boat manager. “Energetic, tireless work ethic, great understanding of the rules.”

He said the race was a physical endurance event over 628 miles. “The wind was in, the wind was out, we drifted, we went backwards, we lost internet access, we didn’t know what was going on until the last few minutes. It was a classic Rolex Sydney Hobart event and we were in it up to our back teeth and it came our way in the end.

“Great boat, this new Beneteau it just jumps out of the water, jumped a bit too hard in the last day or so in those big short waves. It’s a fast boat, we had belief that this boat was going to rate well and do okay in this event, if the weather conditions allowed a small boat event.

“We may be privileged enough to have a boat and a team that gets to this position as people have in the past. But in yacht racing to have everything going right in one event at the right time is probably a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

“So it meant so much to get this right this time. So celebrations, back to normal, business as usual, great boat, great team looking forward to the next regatta in Melbourne, the next Sydney Hobart.”

The last boat to finish, Chris Dawe’s Polaris of Belmont (AUS/NSW) was due to cross the finish line at 0830pm tonight.

The 100-boat fleet that started the 65th Rolex Sydney Hobart had crews representing the USA, UK, New Zealand, Spain, the Netherlands, and New Caledonia, as well as every Australian state.

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Overall Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race confirmed

Posted on 31 December 2009 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Rolex Sydney Hobart] Andy Saies’ Two True survived a protest this afternoon to be confirmed as overall winner of the Tattersall’s Cup, the major prize in the 2009 Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race for the overall IRC handicap winner.

After a two-hour hearing, the International Jury dismissed the protest entered by the Inglis 39 She’s the Culprit (Todd Leary), the Hobart yacht damaged in a crush of boats approaching the first rounding mark after the race start on Sydney Harbour.

Two True, one of the first new Farr-designed Beneteau First 40 stock production racer/cruiser to be imported into Australia, won IRC overall by 42 minutes from another new First 40, (Mike Welsh) after a close race-long duel in which they followed a similar strategy – stay well east of the rhumbline.

Ian Mason’s Sydney 38 Next, in third place, another 1hr 19min behind, was similarly pushed by close competition in the six-boat Sydney 38 fleet racing one-design, as well as on IRC handicap. Another Sydney 38, Swish (Steven Proud) from the strong Sydney fleet, was fourth and Tony Kirby’s Jeppersen X-41 Patrice Six, fifth.

Two True, overall winner of the Tattersall’s Cup. Photo copyright Rolex / Daniel Foster

In sixth place was the 2009 Rolex Fastnet Race winner Ran (Niklas Zennstrom), from the UK.

Two True, from the Cruising Yacht Club of South Australia, is the first yacht from South Australia to win the Tattersall’s Cup since Kevan Pearce’s win with SAP Ausmaid in 2000. The South Australians continue to be strongly committed to the Rolex Sydney Hobart Race, sailing 1000 nautical miles just to get to the start.

Owner-skipper Saies said he was absolutely elated at the win after being in the surreal situation of not knowing the outcome until after the protest hearing. “Obviously we are very happy with the jury’s decision. We believe we did everything in the circumstances to avoid significant damage to the other boat. We gave our intention to protest, we did a 720 (degree penalty turn), though the damage to the other boat was minor and superficial.”

“I respect the decision of the skipper of She’s the Culprit not to continue racing in those circumstances, but obviously we are very happy and delighted with the outcome.”

He thanked his crew, which raced the two prior Sydney Hobart Races on his previous boat True North, a Beneteau First 40. “The Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race cannot be won without a great team, a great boat and an ounce of Sydney Hobart luck. Our team are fabulous guys. We have worked together for the past three years on my previous boat True North.” Saies particularly thanked Brett Young, his team and boat manager. “Energetic, tireless work ethic, great understanding of the rules.”

He said the race was a physical endurance event over 628 miles. “The wind was in, the wind was out, we drifted, we went backwards, we lost internet access, we didn’t know what was going on until the last few minutes. It was a classic Rolex Sydney Hobart event and we were in it up to our back teeth and it came our way in the end.

“Great boat, this new Beneteau it just jumps out of the water, jumped a bit too hard in the last day or so in those big short waves. It’s a fast boat, we had belief that this boat was going to rate well and do okay in this event, if the weather conditions allowed a small boat event.

“We may be privileged enough to have a boat and a team that gets to this position as people have in the past. But in yacht racing to have everything going right in one event at the right time is probably a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

“So it meant so much to get this right this time. So celebrations, back to normal, business as usual, great boat, great team looking forward to the next regatta in Melbourne, the next Sydney Hobart.”

The last boat to finish, Chris Dawe’s Polaris of Belmont (AUS/NSW) was due to cross the finish line at 0830pm tonight.

The 100-boat fleet that started the 65th Rolex Sydney Hobart had crews representing the USA, UK, New Zealand, Spain, the Netherlands, and New Caledonia, as well as every Australian state.

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Video: Rolex Sydney Hobart update #1

Posted on 28 December 2009 by Valencia Sailing

Rolex Sydney Hobart update #1. Sydney, 28 December 2009. Video copyright Seven Network

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Video: Rolex Sydney Hobart update #1

Posted on 28 December 2009 by Valencia Sailing

Rolex Sydney Hobart update #1. Sydney, 28 December 2009. Video copyright Seven Network

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Video: Rolex Sydney Hobart update #4

Posted on 27 December 2009 by Valencia Sailing

Rolex Sydney Hobart update #4. Sydney, 27 December 2009. Video copyright Seven Network

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Video: Rolex Sydney Hobart update #4

Posted on 27 December 2009 by Valencia Sailing

Rolex Sydney Hobart update #4. Sydney, 27 December 2009. Video copyright Seven Network

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