Archive | Louis Vuitton Pacific Series

Video: Highlights from the 6th day of the Louis Vuitton Trophy

Posted on 13 November 2009 by Valencia Sailing

Note: This video corresponds to Thursday’s racing action. The Louis Vuitton Trophy organizers publish their videos the following day!

Video highlights from the 6th day of the Louis Vuitton Trophy. Nice, 12 November 2009. Video copyright Louis Vuitton Trophy

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Video: Highlights from the 6th day of the Louis Vuitton Trophy

Posted on 13 November 2009 by Valencia Sailing

Note: This video corresponds to Thursday’s racing action. The Louis Vuitton Trophy organizers publish their videos the following day!

Video highlights from the 6th day of the Louis Vuitton Trophy. Nice, 12 November 2009. Video copyright Louis Vuitton Trophy

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Emirates Team NZ receives TP52 yacht

Posted on 16 February 2009 by Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ, fresh winner of the Louis Vuitton Pacific Series, got delivery on Monday afternoon of their brand new TP52 yacht from Cookson yachts. The Botín-designed boat was officially launched later that day and will be used by the kiwi team in the 2009 Audi Medcup circuit.

The brand new TP52 arrives at the Emirates Team NZ base. Auckland, 16 February 2009. Photo copyright Kiwi Magic

The brand new TP52 arrives at the Emirates Team NZ base. Auckland, 16 February 2009. Photo copyright Kiwi MagicThe brand new TP52 arrives at the Emirates Team NZ base. Auckland, 16 February 2009. Photo copyright Kiwi Magic

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Emirates Team NZ receives TP52 yacht

Posted on 16 February 2009 by Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ, fresh winner of the Louis Vuitton Pacific Series, got delivery on Monday afternoon of their brand new TP52 yacht from Cookson yachts. The Botín-designed boat was officially launched later that day and will be used by the kiwi team in the 2009 Audi Medcup circuit.

The brand new TP52 arrives at the Emirates Team NZ base. Auckland, 16 February 2009. Photo copyright Kiwi Magic

The brand new TP52 arrives at the Emirates Team NZ base. Auckland, 16 February 2009. Photo copyright Kiwi MagicThe brand new TP52 arrives at the Emirates Team NZ base. Auckland, 16 February 2009. Photo copyright Kiwi Magic

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LV Pacific Series: Alinghi takes first blood in final against Emirates Team NZ

Posted on 13 February 2009 by Valencia Sailing

In a rematch of the America’s Cup races in Valencia in 2007, the first point went today to the America’s Cup holder, in brisk conditions.

According to Ray Davies, Emirates Team NZ tactician, his team executed the planned prestart procedure, seeking to position the boat on the pin end of the starting line because they thought it would be favored. In the 30 minutes preceding the start they had observed that trend and hoped it would continue. Unfortunately for them, it didn’t.

Ed Baird admitted not having a strong position in the prestart, he just found a hole on the line a placed the yacht but, more importantly, on the committee boat end. The wind didn’t finally shift left and the Swiss yacht was clearly in a more favorable position. They led throughout the first beat but could feel the Kiwis breathe on their neck. They rounded the top mark just 12 seconds ahead of them.

The race could have stayed very close and tight if it wasn’t for a slight crew error during a gybe on the New Zealand boat, proving once again that the Series will be won by the team that commits the least errors. The spinnaker halyard slipped, giving Alinghi a further precious 10 seconds of advantage. They rounded the leeward gate with a 20-second lead and form that point made an excellent job in covering the New Zealanders, never giving them the possibility to pass.

The Americas’ Cup holder crossed the finish line 22 seconds ahead of the Louis vuitton Cup winner.

After waiting until 3:30pm, Principal Race Officer Peter Reggio canceled the day’s sailing. With the breeze constantly close to 30 knots it was impossible to hold any further races.

My apologies for the photos, but it’s damn hard to sit on the bow of the umpire boat, taking pictures and making sure the camera doesn’t get soaked, with 25 knots of breeze and choppy seas.

Prestart of Race 1 of the Louis Vuitton Pacific Series final. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team New Zealand in the prestart procedure of the first race. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Alinghi takes the right side in the first beat. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

On the other hand, Emirates Team NZ looks for that left shift that never came. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

In the first crossing, Alinghi is already ahead. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Alinghi is comfortably ahead at the approach to the 1st weather mark. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ sailing towards the 1st weather mark. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ round the 1st weather mark. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Alinghi is leading the race at the beginning of the 1st run. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

While Alinghi is sailing smoothly in the 1st run…. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

… disaster strikes on the Emirates Team NZ boat. The spinnaker halyard slips. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Tense moments on the Emirates Team NZ boat as the spinnaker halyard slips. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Tense moments on the Emirates Team NZ boat as the spinnaker halyard slips. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Tense moments on the Emirates Team NZ boat as the spinnaker halyard slips. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ opts for the right buoy of the leeward gate. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Alinghi keep their lead in the 2nd beat. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ round the 2nd top mark 25 seconds behind Alinghi. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Last leg of the race and Alinghi powers ahead. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

The America’s Cup holders sail flawlessly and pocket one point. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

This Kiwi is smiling… Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

This Kiwi is not smiling… Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

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LV Pacific Series: Alinghi takes first blood in final against Emirates Team NZ

Posted on 13 February 2009 by Valencia Sailing

In a rematch of the America’s Cup races in Valencia in 2007, the first point went today to the America’s Cup holder, in brisk conditions.

According to Ray Davies, Emirates Team NZ tactician, his team executed the planned prestart procedure, seeking to position the boat on the pin end of the starting line because they thought it would be favored. In the 30 minutes preceding the start they had observed that trend and hoped it would continue. Unfortunately for them, it didn’t.

Ed Baird admitted not having a strong position in the prestart, he just found a hole on the line a placed the yacht but, more importantly, on the committee boat end. The wind didn’t finally shift left and the Swiss yacht was clearly in a more favorable position. They led throughout the first beat but could feel the Kiwis breathe on their neck. They rounded the top mark just 12 seconds ahead of them.

The race could have stayed very close and tight if it wasn’t for a slight crew error during a gybe on the New Zealand boat, proving once again that the Series will be won by the team that commits the least errors. The spinnaker halyard slipped, giving Alinghi a further precious 10 seconds of advantage. They rounded the leeward gate with a 20-second lead and form that point made an excellent job in covering the New Zealanders, never giving them the possibility to pass.

The Americas’ Cup holder crossed the finish line 22 seconds ahead of the Louis vuitton Cup winner.

After waiting until 3:30pm, Principal Race Officer Peter Reggio canceled the day’s sailing. With the breeze constantly close to 30 knots it was impossible to hold any further races.

My apologies for the photos, but it’s damn hard to sit on the bow of the umpire boat, taking pictures and making sure the camera doesn’t get soaked, with 25 knots of breeze and choppy seas.

Prestart of Race 1 of the Louis Vuitton Pacific Series final. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team New Zealand in the prestart procedure of the first race. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Alinghi takes the right side in the first beat. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

On the other hand, Emirates Team NZ looks for that left shift that never came. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

In the first crossing, Alinghi is already ahead. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Alinghi is comfortably ahead at the approach to the 1st weather mark. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ sailing towards the 1st weather mark. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ round the 1st weather mark. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Alinghi is leading the race at the beginning of the 1st run. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

While Alinghi is sailing smoothly in the 1st run…. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

… disaster strikes on the Emirates Team NZ boat. The spinnaker halyard slips. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Tense moments on the Emirates Team NZ boat as the spinnaker halyard slips. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Tense moments on the Emirates Team NZ boat as the spinnaker halyard slips. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Tense moments on the Emirates Team NZ boat as the spinnaker halyard slips. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ opts for the right buoy of the leeward gate. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Alinghi keep their lead in the 2nd beat. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ round the 2nd top mark 25 seconds behind Alinghi. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Last leg of the race and Alinghi powers ahead. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

The America’s Cup holders sail flawlessly and pocket one point. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

This Kiwi is smiling… Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

This Kiwi is not smiling… Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

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Alinghi Will Race Emirates Team NZ in LV Pacific Series Final

Posted on 12 February 2009 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: LV Pacific Series] Switzerland triumphed in a face-off between America’s Cup winners Ed Baird and Russell Coutts this morning. Steering Switzerland’s Alinghi, Baird slammed the gate on Coutts and BMW Oracle on the start line and went on to win the challenger finals of the Louis Vuitton Pacific Series 2-0.

Tomorrow Alinghi meets host Emirates Team New Zealand at the beginning of a two-day, seven-race regatta for the Louis Vuitton Pacific Series trophy.

Today’s race marked the end of 13 days of high-energy match racing to select a finalist to race against Emirates Team New Zealand. The home team raced in two round robins with nine international teams from eight countries but sat out the sail-off series that finished today.

TV New Zealands reports on Alinghi’s convincing victory over BMW Oracle. Auckland, 12 February 2009. Video copyright TV New Zealand

Yesterday, the Swiss team, skippered by Kiwi Brad Butterworth with Baird steering, pulled off a shock victory against Coutts and his American team. Coutts had led the entire race but lost by one second.

“You can always reflect on things that might have been and yesterday I think perhaps we got a little complacent at the end of the race,” Coutts said. “The finishing line was heavily biased towards the committee boat end and it is a pretty elementary thing to spot, but we sort of missed that, so that was our fatal error.”

Today, with the threat of heavy wind this afternoon, racing started early in a 15-knot northerly and for Coutts and the Americans it was over before the start gun fired as Baird blocked his approach to the start line.

Oracle had enjoyed the advantage of the right hand entry at the five minute gun and engaged Alinghi in a couple of tight circles, the boats only metres apart. With 1:30 remaining, both boats were lining up for the start inside the starboard layline with Oracle astern and to weather.

As they approached the line Baird remained on starboard but pointed his bow straight at the committee boat. Coutts had nowhere to go and went head to wind as Baird bore off at speed right close to the committee boat.

Coutts could only follow slowly dead astern in his opponent’s wake. The American boat was trailing by 40 metres just moments after the start and never threatened Alinghi as the margin opened out to 58 seconds at the second weather mark and over a minute at the finish

“We were in quite a nice position today and had plenty of time to assess the options coming on the final approach to the start,” Coutts said ruefully. “We burned up a little too much time when we didn’t need to.”

Asked if problems with his boat’s trim tab affected steering during the start, Coutts acknowledged that there was a problem with its control chain a couple of minutes before the start. “That’s not why we lost though,” he said emphatically. “No excuses. We lost the race.”

Asked if he’d return to New Zealand for a similar event, Coutts said: “I thoroughly enjoyed the racing over the last few weeks. I think it’s a fantastic event and I think in these economic times the idea that Louis Vuitton and Emirates Team New Zealand have come up with where all the teams race in borrowed boats, rather than shipping boats all around the world is frankly a commercial reality. There’s no question in my mind that this format works, it’s something that should be looked at in future.”

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Alinghi Will Race Emirates Team NZ in LV Pacific Series Final

Posted on 12 February 2009 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: LV Pacific Series] Switzerland triumphed in a face-off between America’s Cup winners Ed Baird and Russell Coutts this morning. Steering Switzerland’s Alinghi, Baird slammed the gate on Coutts and BMW Oracle on the start line and went on to win the challenger finals of the Louis Vuitton Pacific Series 2-0.

Tomorrow Alinghi meets host Emirates Team New Zealand at the beginning of a two-day, seven-race regatta for the Louis Vuitton Pacific Series trophy.

Today’s race marked the end of 13 days of high-energy match racing to select a finalist to race against Emirates Team New Zealand. The home team raced in two round robins with nine international teams from eight countries but sat out the sail-off series that finished today.

TV New Zealands reports on Alinghi’s convincing victory over BMW Oracle. Auckland, 12 February 2009. Video copyright TV New Zealand

Yesterday, the Swiss team, skippered by Kiwi Brad Butterworth with Baird steering, pulled off a shock victory against Coutts and his American team. Coutts had led the entire race but lost by one second.

“You can always reflect on things that might have been and yesterday I think perhaps we got a little complacent at the end of the race,” Coutts said. “The finishing line was heavily biased towards the committee boat end and it is a pretty elementary thing to spot, but we sort of missed that, so that was our fatal error.”

Today, with the threat of heavy wind this afternoon, racing started early in a 15-knot northerly and for Coutts and the Americans it was over before the start gun fired as Baird blocked his approach to the start line.

Oracle had enjoyed the advantage of the right hand entry at the five minute gun and engaged Alinghi in a couple of tight circles, the boats only metres apart. With 1:30 remaining, both boats were lining up for the start inside the starboard layline with Oracle astern and to weather.

As they approached the line Baird remained on starboard but pointed his bow straight at the committee boat. Coutts had nowhere to go and went head to wind as Baird bore off at speed right close to the committee boat.

Coutts could only follow slowly dead astern in his opponent’s wake. The American boat was trailing by 40 metres just moments after the start and never threatened Alinghi as the margin opened out to 58 seconds at the second weather mark and over a minute at the finish

“We were in quite a nice position today and had plenty of time to assess the options coming on the final approach to the start,” Coutts said ruefully. “We burned up a little too much time when we didn’t need to.”

Asked if problems with his boat’s trim tab affected steering during the start, Coutts acknowledged that there was a problem with its control chain a couple of minutes before the start. “That’s not why we lost though,” he said emphatically. “No excuses. We lost the race.”

Asked if he’d return to New Zealand for a similar event, Coutts said: “I thoroughly enjoyed the racing over the last few weeks. I think it’s a fantastic event and I think in these economic times the idea that Louis Vuitton and Emirates Team New Zealand have come up with where all the teams race in borrowed boats, rather than shipping boats all around the world is frankly a commercial reality. There’s no question in my mind that this format works, it’s something that should be looked at in future.”

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