Archive | Juan Kouyoumdjian

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HDS sets up shop at Lorient, the new "Sailing Valley"

Posted on 22 June 2010 by Valencia Sailing

The Brest-based company HDS, created by Hervé Devaux in 1994 and specialised in design, calculation and structural engineering for sailing boats, is expanding its activities to Lorient. Denis Glehen, former No.2 at HDS Brest is taking charge of GSea Design, a new structure that aims to develop within Lorient’s offshore racing hub in partnership with HDS.

HDS assists sailors, their teams, as well as architects and shipyards in the design of increasingly high performance boats. Michel Desjoyeaux, Franck Cammas, Pascal Bidégorry, Vincent Riou, Bernard Stamm, Roland Jourdain and Alain Thébault, the list of sailors who put their trust in this design office is a reflection of its skills.

THE PLACE TO BE

Initiated by the town of Lorient, the conversion of the submarine base into what is effectively the French version of “Sailing Valley”, as been a great success. An impressive number of companies that are not only specialised in competitive sailing but in yachting in general, have set themselves up here over the past few years making Lorient the place to be for professionals in this sector.

Engineers from HDS Brest and now GSea Design work with many sailing teams and suppliers based in Lorient (Groupama, Banque Populaire, Hydroptère, Lorima) and the nearby Port-La Forêt (Foncia, PRB Team, CDK), Concarneau (Veolia Environnement, Britair) and Vannes (naval architects VPLP, Multiplast). As such, for the company’s two associates, Hervé Devaux and Denis Glehen, the strategic decision to set up in Lorient was obvious!

Within this new structure, Denis Glehen can count on the support of two colleagues. The first, Tanguy Redon, is a composite specialist and a naval architect (notably having worked for PRB Team). The second is Armand De Jacquelot, a graduate from the Centrale Nantes engineering school, who practised his art with the naval architect Guillaume Verdier. Over the past few weeks, the team has also benefited from the support of two future graduates of the same legendary French engineering school: Yuri Baretto Kaminski and Zhaozi Zu.

The GSea Design team

JUSTIFIABLE AMBITION

GSea Design is benefiting from HDS’ expertise to achieve its three goals. Firstly, through the creation of this structure in Lorient, it intends to develop the close links it has with existing customers, which is essential if it is to be effective.

Next, Denis Glehen wishes to reinforce the presence of the design office on an international level. The latter is a justifiable ambition for these experts who recently won the America’s Cup with the Americans from BMW Oracle Racing, have for many years been a reference for the skippers of the IMOCA 60’ monohull class, which is becoming more and more international. It should also be noted that Denis is currently a member of the Groupama Design Team involved in the design of the new VOR 70 monohull for the Volvo Ocean Race 2011-2012, whose participation will signal France’s return to one of the major international sailing events.

Finally, GSea Design is keen to expand further into the world of “ocean cruising” and exceptional multihulls, where the links with the racing boats are numerous. On large craft, the structural constraints require the expertise of specialists. It is in this way that HDS’ skills have already been drawn upon for the creation of two luxury catamarans measuring 110 and 130 foot designed by VPLP, as well as the complete refit in Australia of “Lady Barbaretta”, the 105 foot catamaran owned by billionaire Richard Branson.

GSEA DESIGN’S CURRENT PROJECTS

VOR 70’ Groupama 4, new boat of Franck Cammas’ Team for the 2011-2012 Volvo Ocean Race
60’ IMOCA Foncia, the new VPLP-Verdier design for Michel Desjoyeaux
60’ IMOCA Rivages, the new Juan Kouyoumdjian design for Bernard Stamm
60’ IMOCA Movistar (ex-Foncia), Farr-Mer Agitée design of the 2007 generation

RECENT SUCCESSES FOR HDS

Trimaran USA – BMW ORACLE Racing: Winning trimaran of the 33rd America’s Cup in Feb. 2010
Trimaran Groupama 3 (F.Cammas) : Jules Verne Trophy 2010 in 48d 7h and 44min
Trimaran Banque Populaire V (P.Bidégorry) :
Mediterranean crossing record in 14h 20min and 34s
North Atlantic crossing record in 3d 15h 25min 48s,
24 hours distance record: 908.2 miles at an average speed of 37.84 knots.
Trimaran Hydroptère (A.Thébault): World speed record: an average of 50.17 knots on a mile course
60’ IMOCA Safran (M.Guillemot) : Winner of the Transat Jacques Vabre 2009
60’ IMOCA Foncia (M.Desjoyeaux) : Winner of the Vendee Globe 2008-2009, in 84d 3h 9min 8s.

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TeamOrigin 1851 lead the Portugal Trophy Cascais

Posted on 13 May 2010 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: AUDI Medcup] After five races of the Portugal Trophy Cascais, the first regatta of the 2010 Audi MedCup Circuit, the British crew of TeamOrigin 1851 lead overall by two points ahead of defending champions Emirates Team New Zealand. In the GP42 Series, defending champion Puerto Calero starts their season with two winning guns to become the first leader of the season.

In a thrilling finish to the second race of the day, when the TP52 Series’ pair of four times Olympic medallists, Jochen Schuemann (GER) steering Audi A1 powered by ALL4ONE (FRA/GER) and Ben Ainslie (GBR) steering TeamOrigin 1851 (GBR) duelled down the closing minutes of a fast, full throttle final run, it was the German boat which just pipped the British crew by only one second.

Team Origin lead the Portugal Trophy after 5 races. Cascais, 13 May 2010. Photo copyright Ian Roman / Team Origin

Added to their fourth place in the first race, Circuit newcomers TeamOrigin’s consistency was the result of smart tactical sailing in the puffy, and shifty NW’ly winds. In the first race the breeze averaged around 10-14 knots, but the second TP52 contest enjoyed the strongest winds of the regatta so far with gusts to 22-23 knots producing fast and exciting downwind sailing.

As befits a crew with seven Olympic medals and two America’s Cup wins between their afterguard, TeamOrigin’s starting was sharp today and they were then able to profit from the windshifts to gain places on both of today’s contests.

Emirates Team New Zealand (NZL) took their second successive race victory when they managed to pass Quantum Racing (USA) near the top of the penultimate leg of Race 4. With a fourth in the second race of the day, hard won after they were on the wrong side of a big wind shift inshore during the first upwind leg, the Kiwi team marched up the overall leaderboard from eighth after Wednesday’s first three race, to lie second.

The kiwis got their act together after a mediocre first day and are now 2nd overall, just 2 points behind Team Origin. Cascais, 13 May 2010. Photo copyright Chris Cameron / Emirates Team NZ

TP52 Series Race 4
With a maximum of 15 knots of breeze during the race Quantum Racing lead around the windward mark, gaining from their position on the left side of the course, starting close to the pin, left hand end of the start line.

After chasing Quantum Racing around the first windward mark and on the downwind leg, Emirates Team New Zealand were able to split a little further inshore, gaining from slightly more pressure and a favourable wind shift to be able to cross ahead of the 2008 Circuit winners. Dean Barker (NZL) and the New Zealand crew were able to extend slightly to win by 40 seconds, with the Russian flagged Synergy, steered this season by Karol Jablonski (POL) with Rod Dawson (NZL) calling tactics which finished third.

After skipper-helm Terry Hutchinson (USA) had to be taken off Quantum Racing due to a pre-start accident, tactician Adrian Stead stepped in to deputise. Hutchinson was taken to hospital but was reported to be well enough to watch the racing unfold live on the live TV feed. The Spanish boat Bribón did not start after they suffered broken battens.

Quantum Racing falls to 4th overall after Terry Hutchinson is taken to the hospital with head injury. Cascais, 13 May 2010. Photo copyright Ainhoa Sanchez / AUDI Medcup

TP52 Series Race 5
Jochen Schuemann and the Franco-German team on Audi A1 powered by ALL4ONE scored their first victory on the circuit after profiting early from the wind shift to the right, inshore on the first upwind leg. While they lead around the first windward mark of ahead of Artemis (SWE), TeamOrigin were able to make a big gain on the second beat on that side of the course which brought them on to Artemis stern as they rounded the final buoy.

While Artemis hung on longest, more offshore on the final run, it was a battle to the finish line between Audi A1 powered by ALL4One and TeamOrigin, but the Franco-German crew just got the verdict by one single second, an incredibly close finish between two of the sport’s most accomplished modern day Olympic sailors.

Portugal Trophy, Cascais
TP52 Series – Overall – Day 2

1. TeamOrigin (GBR), 4+9+2+4+2= 21 points
2. Emirates Team New Zealand (NZL), 6+11+1+1+4= 23
3. Synergy (RUS), 8+1+6+3+5= 23
4. Quantum Racing (USA), 1+5+8+2+10= 26
5. Audi A1 powered by ALL4ONE (FRA/GER), 9+7+4+6+1= 27
6. Cristabella (GBR), 2+8+3+5+9= 27 points
7. Artemis (SWE), 3+6+7+8+3= 27
8. Matador (ARG), 7+2+5+9+8= 31
9. Luna Rossa (ITA), 5+3+9+10+6= 33
10. Bigamist 7 (POR), 11+4+11+7+11= 44
11. Bribón (ESP), 10+10+10+12(DNC)+7= 49

So far, that’s the view Luna Rossa has in most races. Cascais, 13 May 2010. Photo copyright Ainhoa Sanchez / AUDI Medcup

Quotes:
Iain Percy (GBR), tactician TeamOrigin (GBR):
“ It was a good day, a solid day with no big mistakes which in a 50 race series is what it is all about so we are happy. It was a really exciting final race. The wind was switching between the wind off the shore and wind off the sea and we kind of knew it was going to goback hard right , so we got ourselves on the inside and when it hit we almost managed to roll over All4One, but they passed us on the line, so it was really a fun race.”

“ There’s so many good people, if you make any mistake you are going to be punished hard so we have to try and avoid mistakes. We’ve already made them like everyone on the first year but we have to try to eliminate them as much as we can.”

Jochen Schumann (GER), skipper Audi A1 powered by All4ONe(GER): “ We have a good reason to celebrate. We won our first race as a team, as Audi A1 powered by All4one. It was a tight one. It was probably the windiest race we had so far, also for our team, around 23-25 knots, surfing conditions, we actually struggled a little bit. I think Artemis was a little faster so they rolled us on starboard, but they went outside us and at the end they ended up too deep and couldn’t make a finish with the spinnaker, but from behind there was even more pressure. Origin came and rolled us on the other side, but then diving into the finish we just made it by meters which I think is good enough. This is a very level and open competition, fantastic conditions here in Cascais.”

Synergy, helmed by Karol Jablonski, has a very consistent performance and is now 3rd overall, tied with Emirates Team NZ. Cascais, 13 May 2010. Photo copyright Federico Ferri / AUDI Medcup

Karol Jablonski (POL), skipper Synergy (RUS): “ It’s been tough out there, for sure we were dealing with a few issues on our boat but in the end we managed to score quite good two finishes, third and fifth. What is I would say is very good for us in this conditions specially for the team which sails for the first time together. In the TP52 we have many nationalities together> We have two kiwis, one Italian. I’m Polish, so it’s tough work for us because we have to work on communication but these guys are getting better and better. But we still have a long way to go in the TP52′s and long way to go in the AC boats. We all know this is not going to happen neither in one second nor in one year. This is a long time project. We are happy to have owners who understand this, and I think the future is good for them.”

Adrian Stead (GBR), tactician Quantum Racing (USA): “ They are cracking boats to sail, there’s some pretty good drivers out here and our go was just not getting mixed on the start, the starboard end always looked quite nice but I wasn’t going to put us in there so any star was good and take the race from there. We came out today with twelve points, second race could have been a lot better, but a bit more practice and who knows.”

“ Unfortunately just when we were hosting the mainsail Terry got hit by the boom on the top on his head and was very dizzy and disorientated, very sick so he had a scan, but it looks it’s going to be alright, we had a little giggle, we took out one of our shore crew members and I ended up driving and someone else doing the tactics and pit but we just had to try to make the best of the day with what we had, but hopefully Terry will be back tomorrow. Last time I helmed a whole race was in 2005.”

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TEAMORIGIN 1851 new TP52 named ahead of start of first AUDI MEDCUP event

Posted on 11 May 2010 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Team Origin] TEAMORIGIN, the British America’s Cup team hit a key milestone today, Tuesday 11th May 2010, with the official naming of their first new race boat, a TP52 class boat, which they named ‘TEAMORIGIN 1851’ (1851 being the year of the inaugural race around the Isle of Wight which subsequently became the ‘America’s Cup’).

Based, for this first event in the Audi MedCup series, in the stunning venue of Cascais in Portugal, racing is scheduled to take place between 12th and 16th May. The teams head out today for some practise starts and the official practise race.

Team Origin names their TP52 yacht. Cascais, 11 May 2010. Photo copyright Ian Roman / Team Origin

Sir Keith Mills, the Team Principal, and his wife Lady Maureen Mills had been in town to visit the team and were planning to name the new boat but due to flight problems over the ash cloud, they had to return to the UK on Sunday to fulfil a prior engagement in the UK on Monday evening.

The official naming ceremony was carried out by team members, Leslie Greenhalgh, Marketing Director and Charlotte Harmer, PA to Mike Sanderson & Sailing Team Co-ordinator naming the boat ‘TEAMORIGIN 1851’ with a few words of thanks from Marcus Hutchinson and Mike Sanderson, Team Director.

Team Origin names their TP52 yacht. Cascais, 11 May 2010. Photo copyright Ian Roman / Team Origin

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Team Origin test their new TP52

Posted on 19 March 2010 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Team Origin] TEAMORIGIN’s new TP52 hit the water for the first time today and the team’s shore crew, sailors and designers were there in force to enjoy this exciting moment for the team.

Despite losing a key race yesterday in the Louis Vuitton Trophy Auckland regatta, the TEAMORIGIN sailors were back in the gym and out for a fitness run first thing this morning and then headed out on the water with a new and exciting project on their hands. The team sailed the impressive new boat close to the semi-final action of the regatta and turned a few heads.

Team Origin test their new TP52. Auckland, 19 March 2010. Photo copyright Ian Roman / Team Origin

David Duff, Shore Operations Manager for TEAMORIGIN, commented on the first day’s testing: “It went really well today, we’ve had a very tight schedule and have managed hit all the deadlines spot on so it was very pleasing to see the boat on the water today. It’s pretty impressive to take her out of the shed only two days ago and be sailing in 20 knots today. I’d like to thank everyone who has played a key part in this challenging project – Juan Kouyoumdjian and his team at Juan Yacht Design, Greg Salthouse and the boat build team at Salthouse boatbuilders, North Sails, Southern Spars and our own TEAMORIGIN build and shore team of Nick Bice, Sam Bourne, Dylan Fletcher and Marty Oliver.”

The team will carry out another few days of testing and the boat then gets loaded onto a ship and heads to Europe for its racing season. TEAMORIGIN will compete in the YP52 Audi Med Cup series which consists of 5 regattas around the Mediterranean, with the first event taking place in Cascais starting on 10th May 2010.

Juan Kouyoumdjian (Juan K), Principal Designer of the boat, witnessed the maiden sail today and gave his views “I was really happy to see the boat on the water today, it went extremely well and we passed the structural test phase very quickly and were able to move on to pushing the boat. It performed exactly like we expected it to perform on the first day.”

Ben Ainslie, Skipper and Helmsman of TEAMORIGIN, ommented on the forthcoming TP racing, “We are looking forward to our first crack at the TP52 Audi Med Cup Series, it’s been a really useful project so far from both a design and sailing team perspective and will great to race against some top teams this coming season.”

Team Origin test their new TP52. Auckland, 19 March 2010. Photo copyright Ian Roman / Team Origin

Team Origin test their new TP52. Auckland, 19 March 2010. Photo copyright Ian Roman / Team Origin

Team Origin test their new TP52. Auckland, 19 March 2010. Photo copyright Ian Roman / Team Origin

Team Origin test their new TP52. Auckland, 19 March 2010. Photo copyright Ian Roman / Team Origin

Team Origin test their new TP52. Auckland, 19 March 2010. Photo copyright Ian Roman / Team Origin

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Team Origin’s TP52 program taking shape

Posted on 20 February 2010 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Team Origin] TEAMORIGIN decided to build a new TP52 for the 2010 season and engaged with Juan Kouyoumdjian and his design team as the Principal Designer of the boat. Juan and his team have worked closely with the TEAMORIGIN sailing team in developing the new boat and the process they followed has reflected closely that of an AC design process for the purposes of training and testing. The boat is currently being built at Salthouse Boatbuilders in Auckland, New Zealand, and the team is very pleased with the progress to date. The boat will be shipped to Europe in March ready for the first TP52 Audi Med Cup event in May 2010.

Juan K added his thoughts on this TP52 project, “It has been a hectic and tight programme – the decision to build a new boat was made early on by the team but we had to wait for the TP52 Class to finalise some rule changes and therefore that made it quite a pressurised situation. We were able to start work on some areas ahead of schedule based on some ‘intelligent assumptions’ but only finalized the design details after we had the class rules in full.

He went on to add, “It is a new class for us to design and therefore we were playing the game of catching up and understanding as well as coming up with our own set of solutions, a process of discovery and response, which has presented its challenges but has been a really enlightening process too. We worked incredibly closely with the sailing team and we are all very much looking forward to seeing the end result of the new boat. In summary I think we all feel we have a lot to gain and little to lose in this process.”

The sailing team announced so far for the TEAMORIGIN TP52 sees many familiar squad names and promises to be an exciting team – Ben Ainslie, Iain Percy, Ian Moore, Andrew Simpson, Mike Sanderson, Tony Mutter, Christian Kamp, Chris Brittle, Julien Cressant and Matt Cornwell.

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Team Origin’s TP52 program taking shape

Posted on 20 February 2010 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Team Origin] TEAMORIGIN decided to build a new TP52 for the 2010 season and engaged with Juan Kouyoumdjian and his design team as the Principal Designer of the boat. Juan and his team have worked closely with the TEAMORIGIN sailing team in developing the new boat and the process they followed has reflected closely that of an AC design process for the purposes of training and testing. The boat is currently being built at Salthouse Boatbuilders in Auckland, New Zealand, and the team is very pleased with the progress to date. The boat will be shipped to Europe in March ready for the first TP52 Audi Med Cup event in May 2010.

Juan K added his thoughts on this TP52 project, “It has been a hectic and tight programme – the decision to build a new boat was made early on by the team but we had to wait for the TP52 Class to finalise some rule changes and therefore that made it quite a pressurised situation. We were able to start work on some areas ahead of schedule based on some ‘intelligent assumptions’ but only finalized the design details after we had the class rules in full.

He went on to add, “It is a new class for us to design and therefore we were playing the game of catching up and understanding as well as coming up with our own set of solutions, a process of discovery and response, which has presented its challenges but has been a really enlightening process too. We worked incredibly closely with the sailing team and we are all very much looking forward to seeing the end result of the new boat. In summary I think we all feel we have a lot to gain and little to lose in this process.”

The sailing team announced so far for the TEAMORIGIN TP52 sees many familiar squad names and promises to be an exciting team – Ben Ainslie, Iain Percy, Ian Moore, Andrew Simpson, Mike Sanderson, Tony Mutter, Christian Kamp, Chris Brittle, Julien Cressant and Matt Cornwell.

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James Dadd, VOR Chief Measurer, talks to Valencia Sailing

Posted on 21 October 2009 by Valencia Sailing

Following our recent interview with Juan Kouyoumdjian, Valencia Sailing talked to James Dadd, VOR Chief Measurer, and got his reaction.

Valencia Sailing: Can you tell us what position you held in the 2008-9 Volvo Ocean Race? Have you held similar positions in other major international sailing events?
James Dadd: I was the Chief Measurer of the Volvo Open 70 Rule, and chairman of the Rule Management Group (RMG), who wrote the class rules, interpreted them, amended them, measured the boats, established rule compliance and issued certificates. I also held this position in the 2005-2006 race, and also worked as a measurer for the 2001-2002 race. I was also on the Measurement Committee for the 2000, 2003 & 2007 America’s Cups, although very much an apprentice for the 2000 Cup. I am also the Chief Measurer for the Royal Ocean Racing Club, for whom I have worked for nearly 12 years.

Valencia Sailing: Were you personally involved with the measurement of the two Ericsson Racing yachts?
James Dadd: Yes. The RMG was a small body with only 3 people measuring the boats. We all worked together on all of the boats.

Valencia Sailing: Were the measurers and/or the VOR organization in general negatively predisposed towards Ericsson Racing?
James Dadd: Absolutely not. It is fundamental to this job that every competitor is treated equally. Sometimes competitors get a bit paranoid, thinking we are only looking at them in detail, but that most definitely was not the case. We looked at everyone in more detail last race than ever before.

Valencia Sailing: Juan Kouyoumdjian in his interview stated two issues: “First, the penalty Ericsson 3 received before race start for the keel and, second, the prohibition of using on Ericsson 4 the keel we had designed for her”. What’s your opinion on that? He also states that measurers “manipulated” the operation. Did you do anything unlawful?
James Dadd: Of course not, why on earth would we do that? The only reason we wouldn’t issue certificates to any boat with such keels fitted was that they didn’t comply with the rules. In the E3 case the ISAF Jury ruled that we had acted appropriately, and in the E4 case I think the team realised there wasn’t a hope in hell that it was a rule compliant keel, so went to plan B. There were a number of aspects with that keel that were in conflict with the rules as written. Russell Green spent a considerable amount of time going through all of the correspondence and was perfectly happy that we had done more than needed in trying to resolve the situation before anyone set up in Alicante. I have absolutely no doubt that we acted correctly.

Valencia Sailing: He also openly claims that “the document submitted by the Chief Measurer to the Jury was forged”. What document was that?
James Dadd: I haven’t got a clue, but I would love to see it!!

Valencia Sailing: Right before the in-shore regatta in Singapore Juan Kouyoumdjian claims you spent 4 days in the shed, trying to prove Ericsson 4 was 1.2mm too long. The jury then rejected your claim. Was she really 1.2mm too long?
James Dadd: Actually the length measurement did not form part of the protest. The protest we instigated was based around the fact that the team had removed a section of the hull, with one of our measurement screws in it, and replaced the section, and the screw, without telling us so that we could measure the completed hull prior to the start of the race. The precise location of this screw affected the length, draft and floatation measurements. This was a clear oversight, not intentional, but we had to act and take it to the jury to retain the validity of the measurement process. The Jury found that actually the rules implied the measurement was then invalid, but didn’t explicitly state it, so the protest was rejected. This was an eye opener for us and I hope it has helped to improve the rules. I think the jury made the right decision, but whatever, you have to accept the jury’s decision and abide by it.

At the end of the day the boys on E4 deserved their win and those on E3 also did exceptionally. I will never forget shacking Magnus Olsson’s hand as he stepped ashore in Rio.

It is always the job of the competitor to push the rules, and our job to keep them honest. Disagreements happen, but there is no point in taking things personally, it is only a yacht race!!

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James Dadd, VOR Chief Measurer, talks to Valencia Sailing

Posted on 21 October 2009 by Valencia Sailing

Following our recent interview with Juan Kouyoumdjian, Valencia Sailing talked to James Dadd, VOR Chief Measurer, and got his reaction.

Valencia Sailing: Can you tell us what position you held in the 2008-9 Volvo Ocean Race? Have you held similar positions in other major international sailing events?
James Dadd: I was the Chief Measurer of the Volvo Open 70 Rule, and chairman of the Rule Management Group (RMG), who wrote the class rules, interpreted them, amended them, measured the boats, established rule compliance and issued certificates. I also held this position in the 2005-2006 race, and also worked as a measurer for the 2001-2002 race. I was also on the Measurement Committee for the 2000, 2003 & 2007 America’s Cups, although very much an apprentice for the 2000 Cup. I am also the Chief Measurer for the Royal Ocean Racing Club, for whom I have worked for nearly 12 years.

Valencia Sailing: Were you personally involved with the measurement of the two Ericsson Racing yachts?
James Dadd: Yes. The RMG was a small body with only 3 people measuring the boats. We all worked together on all of the boats.

Valencia Sailing: Were the measurers and/or the VOR organization in general negatively predisposed towards Ericsson Racing?
James Dadd: Absolutely not. It is fundamental to this job that every competitor is treated equally. Sometimes competitors get a bit paranoid, thinking we are only looking at them in detail, but that most definitely was not the case. We looked at everyone in more detail last race than ever before.

Valencia Sailing: Juan Kouyoumdjian in his interview stated two issues: “First, the penalty Ericsson 3 received before race start for the keel and, second, the prohibition of using on Ericsson 4 the keel we had designed for her”. What’s your opinion on that? He also states that measurers “manipulated” the operation. Did you do anything unlawful?
James Dadd: Of course not, why on earth would we do that? The only reason we wouldn’t issue certificates to any boat with such keels fitted was that they didn’t comply with the rules. In the E3 case the ISAF Jury ruled that we had acted appropriately, and in the E4 case I think the team realised there wasn’t a hope in hell that it was a rule compliant keel, so went to plan B. There were a number of aspects with that keel that were in conflict with the rules as written. Russell Green spent a considerable amount of time going through all of the correspondence and was perfectly happy that we had done more than needed in trying to resolve the situation before anyone set up in Alicante. I have absolutely no doubt that we acted correctly.

Valencia Sailing: He also openly claims that “the document submitted by the Chief Measurer to the Jury was forged”. What document was that?
James Dadd: I haven’t got a clue, but I would love to see it!!

Valencia Sailing: Right before the in-shore regatta in Singapore Juan Kouyoumdjian claims you spent 4 days in the shed, trying to prove Ericsson 4 was 1.2mm too long. The jury then rejected your claim. Was she really 1.2mm too long?
James Dadd: Actually the length measurement did not form part of the protest. The protest we instigated was based around the fact that the team had removed a section of the hull, with one of our measurement screws in it, and replaced the section, and the screw, without telling us so that we could measure the completed hull prior to the start of the race. The precise location of this screw affected the length, draft and floatation measurements. This was a clear oversight, not intentional, but we had to act and take it to the jury to retain the validity of the measurement process. The Jury found that actually the rules implied the measurement was then invalid, but didn’t explicitly state it, so the protest was rejected. This was an eye opener for us and I hope it has helped to improve the rules. I think the jury made the right decision, but whatever, you have to accept the jury’s decision and abide by it.

At the end of the day the boys on E4 deserved their win and those on E3 also did exceptionally. I will never forget shacking Magnus Olsson’s hand as he stepped ashore in Rio.

It is always the job of the competitor to push the rules, and our job to keep them honest. Disagreements happen, but there is no point in taking things personally, it is only a yacht race!!

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