Archive | Groupama 3

Franck Cammas expected to win the Route du Rhum later today

Posted on 09 November 2010 by Valencia Sailing

At 0500hrs (CET) this morning Cammas on Groupama 3 was still sailing in a contrary southerly breeze of between 10 and 12 knots. Maintaining his present VMG he is expected at Basse-Terre at between 1200hrs and 1400hrs (CET) and at the finish line some two hours later. Cammas has been maintaining the required exceptionally high work rate since yesterday, tacking solo the giant trimaran on which he sailed round the world fully crewed to win the Jules Verne Trophy. Since very early yesterday morning Cammas had completed more than a dozen tacks, and at 0400hrs this morning passed 12 miles north of Antigua, sailing through between the chain of Caribbean islands. By 0800hrs he had just 76 final miles to go, tacked back on starboard tack and was ten miles to the SSW of Antigua.

“The end of a Transatlantic race is always long. It feels like you have finished but you have not.” Pointed out the Groupama 3 skipper this morning, positioned 76 miles from the Basse Terre buoy by 0500hrs (CET). If the wind conditions and direction remain as is, the green tri should reach the SW of Guadeloupe in seven to eight hours.

Franck Cammas approaches the finish line of the Route du Rhum – Banque Postale. Guadeloupe, 9 November 2010. Video copyright Route du Rhum – Banque Postale

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Franck Cammas expected to win the Route du Rhum later today

Posted on 09 November 2010 by Valencia Sailing

At 0500hrs (CET) this morning Cammas on Groupama 3 was still sailing in a contrary southerly breeze of between 10 and 12 knots. Maintaining his present VMG he is expected at Basse-Terre at between 1200hrs and 1400hrs (CET) and at the finish line some two hours later. Cammas has been maintaining the required exceptionally high work rate since yesterday, tacking solo the giant trimaran on which he sailed round the world fully crewed to win the Jules Verne Trophy. Since very early yesterday morning Cammas had completed more than a dozen tacks, and at 0400hrs this morning passed 12 miles north of Antigua, sailing through between the chain of Caribbean islands. By 0800hrs he had just 76 final miles to go, tacked back on starboard tack and was ten miles to the SSW of Antigua.

“The end of a Transatlantic race is always long. It feels like you have finished but you have not.” Pointed out the Groupama 3 skipper this morning, positioned 76 miles from the Basse Terre buoy by 0500hrs (CET). If the wind conditions and direction remain as is, the green tri should reach the SW of Guadeloupe in seven to eight hours.

Franck Cammas approaches the finish line of the Route du Rhum – Banque Postale. Guadeloupe, 9 November 2010. Video copyright Route du Rhum – Banque Postale

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Franck Cammas heads south in the Route du Rhum – La Banque Postale

Posted on 01 November 2010 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Groupama] Twenty four hours after a spectacular start, Franck Cammas is continuing his course at a hellish pace. Heading southward, the skipper of Groupama has already passed Cape Finisterre and is beginning his descent along the Spanish coast. Accredited with fourth place due to her SE’ly position, in reality Groupama 3′s position is doubtless much envied by her rivals.

“We’re trying to pick our way along the eastern edge of the zone of high pressure. For this, it was necessary to go fast and drop down the coast at full pelt by keeping the gennaker aloft. The sailing was borderline at times but we came out of it just fine” said Franck during a quick radio link-up with Press HQ for the Route du Rhum La Banque Postale at midday.

An attacker through and through, the skipper of Groupama 3 benefited from a powerful, fast boat to traverse the Bay of Biscay at high speed despite a sizeable swell and a dark night.

Contacted via telephone at 1600 hours, Jean-Luc Nélias, one of Franck Cammas’ weather advisors gave his view of the situation: “The tricky section is in Groupama 3′s wake now. It was important not to get caught up by the ridge of high pressure. Franck is carrying everything aloft, as he was at the start, namely full mainsail, staysail and gennaker. He’s in good shape and managing to sleep in 20 minute chunks”.

By sailing at an average of 23 knots, Groupama 3 is making up nearly 7 miles an hour on the leader of the ranking, Thomas Coville. Positioned further North and West, his Sodebo is logically closer to the finish, but has less pace. This trend could continue over the next few hours, that is unless Thomas decides to strike right out to the West.

Even further to the North and further West, Sydney Gavignet has definitively opted for the great circle route. This is synonymous with the shortest route but also the most testing as the bulk of it will be raced in headwinds. Skippering a trimaran which is theoretically a little less speedy than the other favourites, he’s trying his luck by typically committing himself to an option.

Astern but practically following the same line as Groupama 3, Francis Joyon and Yann Guichard are also seeking to make headway to the south. In a less well established wind, they’re just a few knots off the pace.

So the daggers are drawn then and it’s a fairly uniform fleet in terms of performance, despite the disparity of the trimarans. Once again it’s the sailors who will make the difference on what is a demanding course, where the weather may well have a few surprises up its sleeve…

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Franck Cammas heads south in the Route du Rhum – La Banque Postale

Posted on 01 November 2010 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Groupama] Twenty four hours after a spectacular start, Franck Cammas is continuing his course at a hellish pace. Heading southward, the skipper of Groupama has already passed Cape Finisterre and is beginning his descent along the Spanish coast. Accredited with fourth place due to her SE’ly position, in reality Groupama 3′s position is doubtless much envied by her rivals.

“We’re trying to pick our way along the eastern edge of the zone of high pressure. For this, it was necessary to go fast and drop down the coast at full pelt by keeping the gennaker aloft. The sailing was borderline at times but we came out of it just fine” said Franck during a quick radio link-up with Press HQ for the Route du Rhum La Banque Postale at midday.

An attacker through and through, the skipper of Groupama 3 benefited from a powerful, fast boat to traverse the Bay of Biscay at high speed despite a sizeable swell and a dark night.

Contacted via telephone at 1600 hours, Jean-Luc Nélias, one of Franck Cammas’ weather advisors gave his view of the situation: “The tricky section is in Groupama 3′s wake now. It was important not to get caught up by the ridge of high pressure. Franck is carrying everything aloft, as he was at the start, namely full mainsail, staysail and gennaker. He’s in good shape and managing to sleep in 20 minute chunks”.

By sailing at an average of 23 knots, Groupama 3 is making up nearly 7 miles an hour on the leader of the ranking, Thomas Coville. Positioned further North and West, his Sodebo is logically closer to the finish, but has less pace. This trend could continue over the next few hours, that is unless Thomas decides to strike right out to the West.

Even further to the North and further West, Sydney Gavignet has definitively opted for the great circle route. This is synonymous with the shortest route but also the most testing as the bulk of it will be raced in headwinds. Skippering a trimaran which is theoretically a little less speedy than the other favourites, he’s trying his luck by typically committing himself to an option.

Astern but practically following the same line as Groupama 3, Francis Joyon and Yann Guichard are also seeking to make headway to the south. In a less well established wind, they’re just a few knots off the pace.

So the daggers are drawn then and it’s a fairly uniform fleet in terms of performance, despite the disparity of the trimarans. Once again it’s the sailors who will make the difference on what is a demanding course, where the weather may well have a few surprises up its sleeve…

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Groupama 3 breaks round-the-world record !!!

Posted on 20 March 2010 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Groupama] The Jules Verne Trophy now belongs to ten men who have sailed around the globe at an average of 18.76 knots along the optimum course, beating the reference time set by Orange 2 in 2005 by 2 days 08 hours 35 minutes. Franck Cammas and his men crossed the finish line off the Créac’h lighthouse at Ushant (Finistère) at 21h40’45″ UTC Saturday 20th March. They are due to make the Port du Château in Brest at around 0900 UTC tomorrow.

The skipper Franck Cammas, navigator Stan Honey, watch leaders Fred Le Peutrec and Steve Ravussin, helmsmen/trimmers Loïc Le Mignon, Thomas Coville and Lionel Lemonchois, and the three bowmen Bruno Jeanjean, Ronan Le Goff and Jacques Caraës, supported on shore by router Sylvain Mondon, have pulled it off: they have beaten the round the world record under sail via the three capes!

In 48 days 07 hours 44 minutes, Groupama 3 has certainly had her highs and lows, as she hasn’t always been ahead of the reference time set by Bruno Peyron and his crew in 2005. On the contrary! The giant trimaran had a deficit of just over 500 miles in relation to Orange 2 and was only able to beat the Jules Verne Trophy record thanks to a dazzling final sprint from the equator. At that stage they had a deficit of one day and two hours, but by devouring the North Atlantic in 6 days 10 h 35′, Groupama 3 quite simply pulverised the reference time over this section of the course.

Groupama 3 crosses the finish line and breaks the round-the-world record. Ouessant, 20 March 2010. Video copyright Groupama

Spring parade
Setting out on 31st January 2010 whilst the weather `window’ was not particularly favourable, Franck Cammas and his men have alternated between some extremely fast sequences and some very slow ones. Indeed, the conditions were very varied on this round the world, and even the wind rarely exceeded 40 knots. It has to be said that the chosen trajectory sought to avoid the heavy seas and the overly strong breezes, which considerably increased the distance to travel: in fact Groupama 3 sailed 28,523 miles whilst the official optimum course amounts to 21,760 miles. As such, in terms of actual speed across the ground, the giant trimaran maintained an average speed of 24.6 knots! The trickiest zone, both on the outward journey and the return proved to be the South Atlantic. During the descent problems arose due to the calms and on the ascent due to the headwinds.

Tonight Groupama 3 is remaining offshore of Ushant to await daybreak: she will enter the channel into the harbour of Brest at around 0830 UTC under sail, then a parade around the harbour will culminate with her tying up in the Port du Château at around 1000 hours UTC. A number of France’s top sailors, including Bruno Peyron, previous Jules Verne Trophy holder since 2005, have made the trip to Brest to welcome in the victorious crew and the locals are planning to come out in force to welcome home the ten round the world sailors on Sunday morning.

And now, full speed ahead to win the Volvo Ocean Race. Ouessant, 20 March 2010. Photo copyright Yvan Zedda / Groupama

Arrival of Groupama 3
Saturday 20th March 2010 at 21 hours 40 minutes 45 seconds UTC
In 48 days 7 hours 44 minutes 52 seconds
Improvement in relation to the previous record*
2 days 8 hours 35 minutes 12 seconds
*Subject to approval by the WSSRC
(Orange II – Bruno Peyron – in 50 days 16 hours 20 minutes and 4 seconds in 2005

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Groupama 3 breaks round-the-world record !!!

Posted on 20 March 2010 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Groupama] The Jules Verne Trophy now belongs to ten men who have sailed around the globe at an average of 18.76 knots along the optimum course, beating the reference time set by Orange 2 in 2005 by 2 days 08 hours 35 minutes. Franck Cammas and his men crossed the finish line off the Créac’h lighthouse at Ushant (Finistère) at 21h40’45″ UTC Saturday 20th March. They are due to make the Port du Château in Brest at around 0900 UTC tomorrow.

The skipper Franck Cammas, navigator Stan Honey, watch leaders Fred Le Peutrec and Steve Ravussin, helmsmen/trimmers Loïc Le Mignon, Thomas Coville and Lionel Lemonchois, and the three bowmen Bruno Jeanjean, Ronan Le Goff and Jacques Caraës, supported on shore by router Sylvain Mondon, have pulled it off: they have beaten the round the world record under sail via the three capes!

In 48 days 07 hours 44 minutes, Groupama 3 has certainly had her highs and lows, as she hasn’t always been ahead of the reference time set by Bruno Peyron and his crew in 2005. On the contrary! The giant trimaran had a deficit of just over 500 miles in relation to Orange 2 and was only able to beat the Jules Verne Trophy record thanks to a dazzling final sprint from the equator. At that stage they had a deficit of one day and two hours, but by devouring the North Atlantic in 6 days 10 h 35′, Groupama 3 quite simply pulverised the reference time over this section of the course.

Groupama 3 crosses the finish line and breaks the round-the-world record. Ouessant, 20 March 2010. Video copyright Groupama

Spring parade
Setting out on 31st January 2010 whilst the weather `window’ was not particularly favourable, Franck Cammas and his men have alternated between some extremely fast sequences and some very slow ones. Indeed, the conditions were very varied on this round the world, and even the wind rarely exceeded 40 knots. It has to be said that the chosen trajectory sought to avoid the heavy seas and the overly strong breezes, which considerably increased the distance to travel: in fact Groupama 3 sailed 28,523 miles whilst the official optimum course amounts to 21,760 miles. As such, in terms of actual speed across the ground, the giant trimaran maintained an average speed of 24.6 knots! The trickiest zone, both on the outward journey and the return proved to be the South Atlantic. During the descent problems arose due to the calms and on the ascent due to the headwinds.

Tonight Groupama 3 is remaining offshore of Ushant to await daybreak: she will enter the channel into the harbour of Brest at around 0830 UTC under sail, then a parade around the harbour will culminate with her tying up in the Port du Château at around 1000 hours UTC. A number of France’s top sailors, including Bruno Peyron, previous Jules Verne Trophy holder since 2005, have made the trip to Brest to welcome in the victorious crew and the locals are planning to come out in force to welcome home the ten round the world sailors on Sunday morning.

And now, full speed ahead to win the Volvo Ocean Race. Ouessant, 20 March 2010. Photo copyright Yvan Zedda / Groupama

Arrival of Groupama 3
Saturday 20th March 2010 at 21 hours 40 minutes 45 seconds UTC
In 48 days 7 hours 44 minutes 52 seconds
Improvement in relation to the previous record*
2 days 8 hours 35 minutes 12 seconds
*Subject to approval by the WSSRC
(Orange II – Bruno Peyron – in 50 days 16 hours 20 minutes and 4 seconds in 2005

Comments (3)

Groupama 3 goal: Ushant

Posted on 19 March 2010 by Valencia Sailing

Groupama 3′s trajectory seems more rectilinear than recent days and, if all goes to plan, Franck Cammas and his men shouldn’t have to put in any more gybes. However, they will have to constantly adapt the sail area as the N’ly wind is forecast to be very unstable.

It’s the final home straight (or nearly) for the giant trimaran as this morning the wind shifted round from the SW to the N and then the NW as it eased. Indeed, by approaching the centre of the low, which is shifting across towards Europe, the wind temporarily dropped to around ten knots, but this reduction in pace proved to be fleeting. Nevertheless, it will take another good day at sea before Groupama 3 makes Ushant.

“The N’ly wind is rather weak at the moment, but we’re ahead of a front which is bringing us more breeze. We will certainly be on the direct course, but the sheets will be just slightly eased for the vast majority of the remaining distance to the finish. We’re hoping that it will be more of a beam wind than close-hauled sailing as we’ll be faster! We’d be able to make thirty knots rather than fifteen to seventeen knots… We’re continuing to make headway in a SW’ly swell and it’s the sea state above all that will dictate our speed, especially if we are close-hauled. The low is going faster than us so it will provide us with a N’ly wind as far as the finish, since it is shifting across towards Brittany, even though it is likely to deteriorate with a fair number of squalls” indicated Franck Cammas during the 1130 UTC radio link-up with Groupama’s Race HQ in Brest.

As such the speeds on the water are fairly variable which makes it hard to predict at what point the giant trimaran will complete this circumnavigation, though it is likely to take less than 49 days. It is inevitable that the last few miles are always a testing time for a crew, who have amassed a month and a half on the water, which makes the motto associated with the island that guards the NW tip of Brittany particular poignant today: “Whoever sees Ushant sees their goal…”

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Groupama 3 goal: Ushant

Posted on 19 March 2010 by Valencia Sailing

Groupama 3′s trajectory seems more rectilinear than recent days and, if all goes to plan, Franck Cammas and his men shouldn’t have to put in any more gybes. However, they will have to constantly adapt the sail area as the N’ly wind is forecast to be very unstable.

It’s the final home straight (or nearly) for the giant trimaran as this morning the wind shifted round from the SW to the N and then the NW as it eased. Indeed, by approaching the centre of the low, which is shifting across towards Europe, the wind temporarily dropped to around ten knots, but this reduction in pace proved to be fleeting. Nevertheless, it will take another good day at sea before Groupama 3 makes Ushant.

“The N’ly wind is rather weak at the moment, but we’re ahead of a front which is bringing us more breeze. We will certainly be on the direct course, but the sheets will be just slightly eased for the vast majority of the remaining distance to the finish. We’re hoping that it will be more of a beam wind than close-hauled sailing as we’ll be faster! We’d be able to make thirty knots rather than fifteen to seventeen knots… We’re continuing to make headway in a SW’ly swell and it’s the sea state above all that will dictate our speed, especially if we are close-hauled. The low is going faster than us so it will provide us with a N’ly wind as far as the finish, since it is shifting across towards Brittany, even though it is likely to deteriorate with a fair number of squalls” indicated Franck Cammas during the 1130 UTC radio link-up with Groupama’s Race HQ in Brest.

As such the speeds on the water are fairly variable which makes it hard to predict at what point the giant trimaran will complete this circumnavigation, though it is likely to take less than 49 days. It is inevitable that the last few miles are always a testing time for a crew, who have amassed a month and a half on the water, which makes the motto associated with the island that guards the NW tip of Brittany particular poignant today: “Whoever sees Ushant sees their goal…”

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