Archive | July, 2010

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Video: Highlights from day 5 of the RC44 Valencia Cup

Posted on 31 July 2010 by Valencia Sailing

Highlights from day 5 of the RC44 Valencia Cup. Valencia, 31 July 2010. Video copyright RC44 Class Association

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Team Aqua leads the fleet event of the Valencia RC44 Cup

Posted on 31 July 2010 by Valencia Sailing

This is getting very repeating but you can’t avoid it when conditions are amazing for so long. It has been yet another great day of sailing in Valencia and the 11-strong RC44 fleet had a blast under the shiny Valencian sky, the 20-knot breeze and the big waves. I had the opportunity to be onboard Chris Bake’s Team Aqua during the first race and witness how the tandem Chris Bake – Cameron Appleton together with the rest of the crew worked wonders, scoring two bullets, a third and a fourth.

No matter how many times one I have the chance to be onboard these rockets they never cease to amaze me. Unfortunately, the funkier the conditions get the tougher it is to hold on and shoot acceptable video and photos. It’s not an easy task upwind but it gets a bit easier downwind, especially when planing. I saw a top wind speed of 20.5 knots and top boat speed of 17.5 knots, while in the third and fourth race boat speeds of up to 20 knots were reported.

The start of the first race was quite average for Team Aqua and up to the second weather mark, Chris Bake’s boat was 6th or 7th. That’s where Appleton made a great call, opting for the right side of the course for the final run while the rest of the fleet kept on the left. Team Aqua found more pressure there, sneaked in front of 3 or 4 boats and crossed the finish line 3rd.

However, the best was still to come with two bullets in a row and a fourth in the last race. Given the awful performance by “17″ today, the US boat ceded 15 points, Team Aqua is now leading the fleet race event with 23 points, closely followed by Artemis with 27 points.

Prestart procedure onboard Team Aqua in the 1st fleet race of the day. Valencia, 31 July 2010. Video copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Chris Bake helming Team Aqua in the first race of the day. Valencia, 31 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Onboard Team Aqua in the first race of the day. Valencia, 31 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Gybing onboard Team Aqua with 20 knots of wind. Valencia, 31 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Team Aqua in the approach to the finish line in the first race of the day. Valencia, 31 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Team Aqua gets in front of BMW Oracle in the first top mark. Valencia, 31 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Team Aqua gets in front of Islas Canarias Puerto Calero in the first top mark. Valencia, 31 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

BMW Oracle sailing downwind in the first race of the day. Valencia, 31 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

The back of the fleet sailing downwind in the first race of the day. Valencia, 31 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Taking the spinnaker out while still hiking the Spanish way. Valencia, 31 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

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Video: Highlights from day 4 of the RC44 Valencia Cup

Posted on 31 July 2010 by Valencia Sailing

Highlights from day 4 of the RC44 Valencia Cup. Valencia, 30 July 2010. Video copyright RC44 Class Association

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RC44 Valencia Cup – Day 4: Anders Myralf on "17" annihilates the RC44 fleet

Posted on 30 July 2010 by Valencia Sailing

Greetings from Valencia where the fleet portion of the RC44 Valencia cup started with a bang for “17″ and Anders Myralf, her Danish amateur driver. Four races took place in lighter conditions (8 to 12 knots) on Friday and the Danish helmsman, aided by James Spithill on tactics, scored an impressive three bullets and a fourth.

Being onboard Sea Dubai in the first race and Mascalzone in the third one, I have to admit it wass very difficult to follow the action but the lead “17″ had over the rest of the fleet at times was daunting. They clearly sailed in a league of their own.

Mascalzone Latino is now sitting 10th in the overall leaderboard, however this should be taken with a pinch of salt, especially taking into account the nearly two-year absence of the Italian team from the circuit.

Race 1Harm Mueller-Spreer at the helm of Sea Dubai. Valencia, 30 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Danish match racer Jes Gram-Hansen calling tactics on Sea Dubai. Valencia, 30 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Rounding the bottom mark on Sea Dubai. Valencia, 30 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Torbjorn Tornqvist helming Artemis under the watchful eye of Terry Hutchinson. Valencia, 30 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Mascalzone Latino ready to round the leeward mark. Valencia, 30 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Katusha in the second beat of the race. Valencia, 30 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Igor Lah helming CEEREF in the second beat of the race. Valencia, 30 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Race 3 Vincenzo Onorato drives the RC44 Mascalzone Latino after a nearly two-year absence from the circuit while Tommaso Chieffi, his tactician hikes. Valencia, 30 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Vincenzo Onorato drives the RC44 Mascalzone Latino after a nearly two-year absence from the circuit. Valencia, 30 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Gybing on Mascalzone Latino. Valencia, 30 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

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The "Hand of God" in sailing

Posted on 30 July 2010 by Valencia Sailing

It’s been another long and exciting day in Valencia with the first four fleet races of the RC44 Valencia Cup, even if the breeze didn’t reach the levels we’ve been accustomed to during the last two weeks. Our full report with some beautiful pictures will be online in a couple of hours.

The undisputed leader of the day is “17″ with three bullets and a fourth. Still, the final race of the day had its bit of controversy and was resolved in the jury room after the Spanish team Islas Canarias Puerto Calero filed a protest against the American team.

For all those football-illeterate readers that wonder what relation the title of the article has with today’s races, it refers to Diego Maradona’s infamous goal in the 1986 World Cup when the Argentinean scored against the English, with an illegal, but unpenalised, handball. At the post-game press conference, Maradona claimed that the goal was scored “a little with the head of Maradona and a little with the hand of God”, coining the phrase “Hand of God”.

The “Hand of God” in the RC44′s took place in the prestart of the final race when James Spithill helped amateur helmsman Anders Myralf by taking the helm, something that under the RC44 Class rules is only allowed in emergency situations. As a result of Spithill taking the helm, the Spanish felt they were forced to cross early the starting line and protested. The Jury found “17″ in breach of the rule, as they judged there was no emergency situation while Anders Myralf is an experienced sailor. Finally, the Jury decided to penalize “17″ with one point since, in their view, the yacht didn’t gain any advantage in the race by Spithill’s action.

The “hand of God” in sailing. James Spithill takes the helm of “17″ during the prestart of the fleet race, something that is allowed only in emergency situations according to the RC44 Class rules. Valencia, 30 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

The “hand of God” in sailing. James Spithill takes the helm of “17″ during the prestart of the fleet race, something that is allowed only in emergency situations according to the RC44 Class rules. Valencia, 30 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

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The "Hand of God" in sailing

Posted on 30 July 2010 by Valencia Sailing

It’s been another long and exciting day in Valencia with the first four fleet races of the RC44 Valencia Cup, even if the breeze didn’t reach the levels we’ve been accustomed to during the last two weeks. Our full report with some beautiful pictures will be online in a couple of hours.

The undisputed leader of the day is “17″ with three bullets and a fourth. Still, the final race of the day had its bit of controversy and was resolved in the jury room after the Spanish team Islas Canarias Puerto Calero filed a protest against the American team.

For all those football-illeterate readers that wonder what relation the title of the article has with today’s races, it refers to Diego Maradona’s infamous goal in the 1986 World Cup when the Argentinean scored against the English, with an illegal, but unpenalised, handball. At the post-game press conference, Maradona claimed that the goal was scored “a little with the head of Maradona and a little with the hand of God”, coining the phrase “Hand of God”.

The “Hand of God” in the RC44′s took place in the prestart of the final race when James Spithill helped amateur helmsman Anders Myralf by taking the helm, something that under the RC44 Class rules is only allowed in emergency situations. As a result of Spithill taking the helm, the Spanish felt they were forced to cross early the starting line and protested. The Jury found “17″ in breach of the rule, as they judged there was no emergency situation while Anders Myralf is an experienced sailor. Finally, the Jury decided to penalize “17″ with one point since, in their view, the yacht didn’t gain any advantage in the race by Spithill’s action.

The “hand of God” in sailing. James Spithill takes the helm of “17″ during the prestart of the fleet race, something that is allowed only in emergency situations according to the RC44 Class rules. Valencia, 30 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

The “hand of God” in sailing. James Spithill takes the helm of “17″ during the prestart of the fleet race, something that is allowed only in emergency situations according to the RC44 Class rules. Valencia, 30 July 2010. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

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“New” Little America’s Cup Attracts Dynamic C-Class Catamarans and International Talent

Posted on 29 July 2010 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: New York Yacht Club] Six (possibly seven — pending dramatic repairs) of the fastest, lightest, highly innovative 25-foot catamarans will compete on America’s Cup courses off the coast of Newport, RI.

August 22-28, New York Yacht Club will host the International C-Class Catamaran Championship, also known as The Little America’s Cup.

Nine fleet races will seed the match racing contenders for actual Cup racing. With speculators reviewing monohull and multihull options for the (Big) America’s Cup, this C-Class event provides all of the technology, sportsmanship and spectator highlights that favor a multihull design.

“The boats are the most efficient sailing machines on the water,” maintain Fred Eaton and Magnus Clarke. Winners of the 2007 trophy at the Royal Canadian Yacht Club, in Toronto, they will unveil their new boat, Canaan, in Newport.

Designers are free to experiment. There are no weight or material restrictions. The boats are custom built by the teams to be extremely light — to the edge in fact. With wing rigs they are capable of twice the wind speeds seen on most race courses.

“We can fly a hull in less than five knots of breeze while double trapezing in just six knots of wind,” says Clarke. They can sail fast, but can their repair skills match their boatspeed? A wing was destroyed by a 30-knot gust during mid-July sail trials.

“The mast and control system look intact, and it seems that many of the moldings are OK as well. This wing is not dead, it’s just pining for the fjords!” commented Steve Clark in an online review of the photos. His optimism sums up the technological camaraderie of the fleet.

Clark, along with three longtime multihull champions from Bristol, RI will race the new Aethon, and Cogito, the former gold standard C-Class Cat. The regatta will be as much about twist control as it will be about the latest in pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon, laminate strength, Autoclaves and thermal coefficients.

James Spithill, helmsman of BMW Oracle’s 90-foot catamaran, and winner of the 33rd America’s Cup, will ramp up the focus with fellow Australian Glenn Ashby, an Olympic Silver medallist in multihulls and nine-time, A-Class, world champion.

Paul Larsen, another renowned high-speed sailor will drive England’s entry, Invictus. The event will also feature the French team of Antoine Koch and Jean-Baptiste Le Vaillant.

Six days of sailing, six boats, and only seven design rules. If the Toronto-based shore crew can pull together another wing assembly, the start line will see seven high-speed cats. Three races a day, each totaling six miles, will make for remarkable racing. The exact location on Narragansett Bay is weather dependent.

Sailors, designers, engineers, and lovers of high-speed action can inspect the boats at close range for days prior to the event at Sail Newport, Fort Adams. From August 21 onwards boats will be stored at NYYC. Live footage and post-race interviews will be available.

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“New” Little America’s Cup Attracts Dynamic C-Class Catamarans and International Talent

Posted on 29 July 2010 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: New York Yacht Club] Six (possibly seven — pending dramatic repairs) of the fastest, lightest, highly innovative 25-foot catamarans will compete on America’s Cup courses off the coast of Newport, RI.

August 22-28, New York Yacht Club will host the International C-Class Catamaran Championship, also known as The Little America’s Cup.

Nine fleet races will seed the match racing contenders for actual Cup racing. With speculators reviewing monohull and multihull options for the (Big) America’s Cup, this C-Class event provides all of the technology, sportsmanship and spectator highlights that favor a multihull design.

“The boats are the most efficient sailing machines on the water,” maintain Fred Eaton and Magnus Clarke. Winners of the 2007 trophy at the Royal Canadian Yacht Club, in Toronto, they will unveil their new boat, Canaan, in Newport.

Designers are free to experiment. There are no weight or material restrictions. The boats are custom built by the teams to be extremely light — to the edge in fact. With wing rigs they are capable of twice the wind speeds seen on most race courses.

“We can fly a hull in less than five knots of breeze while double trapezing in just six knots of wind,” says Clarke. They can sail fast, but can their repair skills match their boatspeed? A wing was destroyed by a 30-knot gust during mid-July sail trials.

“The mast and control system look intact, and it seems that many of the moldings are OK as well. This wing is not dead, it’s just pining for the fjords!” commented Steve Clark in an online review of the photos. His optimism sums up the technological camaraderie of the fleet.

Clark, along with three longtime multihull champions from Bristol, RI will race the new Aethon, and Cogito, the former gold standard C-Class Cat. The regatta will be as much about twist control as it will be about the latest in pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon, laminate strength, Autoclaves and thermal coefficients.

James Spithill, helmsman of BMW Oracle’s 90-foot catamaran, and winner of the 33rd America’s Cup, will ramp up the focus with fellow Australian Glenn Ashby, an Olympic Silver medallist in multihulls and nine-time, A-Class, world champion.

Paul Larsen, another renowned high-speed sailor will drive England’s entry, Invictus. The event will also feature the French team of Antoine Koch and Jean-Baptiste Le Vaillant.

Six days of sailing, six boats, and only seven design rules. If the Toronto-based shore crew can pull together another wing assembly, the start line will see seven high-speed cats. Three races a day, each totaling six miles, will make for remarkable racing. The exact location on Narragansett Bay is weather dependent.

Sailors, designers, engineers, and lovers of high-speed action can inspect the boats at close range for days prior to the event at Sail Newport, Fort Adams. From August 21 onwards boats will be stored at NYYC. Live footage and post-race interviews will be available.

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