LV Pacific Series: Alinghi takes first blood in final against Emirates Team NZ

Posted on 13 February 2009 by Valencia Sailing

In a rematch of the America’s Cup races in Valencia in 2007, the first point went today to the America’s Cup holder, in brisk conditions.

According to Ray Davies, Emirates Team NZ tactician, his team executed the planned prestart procedure, seeking to position the boat on the pin end of the starting line because they thought it would be favored. In the 30 minutes preceding the start they had observed that trend and hoped it would continue. Unfortunately for them, it didn’t.

Ed Baird admitted not having a strong position in the prestart, he just found a hole on the line a placed the yacht but, more importantly, on the committee boat end. The wind didn’t finally shift left and the Swiss yacht was clearly in a more favorable position. They led throughout the first beat but could feel the Kiwis breathe on their neck. They rounded the top mark just 12 seconds ahead of them.

The race could have stayed very close and tight if it wasn’t for a slight crew error during a gybe on the New Zealand boat, proving once again that the Series will be won by the team that commits the least errors. The spinnaker halyard slipped, giving Alinghi a further precious 10 seconds of advantage. They rounded the leeward gate with a 20-second lead and form that point made an excellent job in covering the New Zealanders, never giving them the possibility to pass.

The Americas’ Cup holder crossed the finish line 22 seconds ahead of the Louis vuitton Cup winner.

After waiting until 3:30pm, Principal Race Officer Peter Reggio canceled the day’s sailing. With the breeze constantly close to 30 knots it was impossible to hold any further races.

My apologies for the photos, but it’s damn hard to sit on the bow of the umpire boat, taking pictures and making sure the camera doesn’t get soaked, with 25 knots of breeze and choppy seas.

Prestart of Race 1 of the Louis Vuitton Pacific Series final. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team New Zealand in the prestart procedure of the first race. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Alinghi takes the right side in the first beat. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

On the other hand, Emirates Team NZ looks for that left shift that never came. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

In the first crossing, Alinghi is already ahead. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Alinghi is comfortably ahead at the approach to the 1st weather mark. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ sailing towards the 1st weather mark. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ round the 1st weather mark. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Alinghi is leading the race at the beginning of the 1st run. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

While Alinghi is sailing smoothly in the 1st run…. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

… disaster strikes on the Emirates Team NZ boat. The spinnaker halyard slips. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Tense moments on the Emirates Team NZ boat as the spinnaker halyard slips. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Tense moments on the Emirates Team NZ boat as the spinnaker halyard slips. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Tense moments on the Emirates Team NZ boat as the spinnaker halyard slips. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ opts for the right buoy of the leeward gate. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Alinghi keep their lead in the 2nd beat. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ round the 2nd top mark 25 seconds behind Alinghi. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Last leg of the race and Alinghi powers ahead. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

The America’s Cup holders sail flawlessly and pocket one point. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

This Kiwi is smiling… Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

This Kiwi is not smiling… Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

3 Comments For This Post

  1. Anonymous Says:

    So the Swiss beat Oracle again. If I’m counting well, during this series in Auckland Oracle was defeated 3 times out of 3 by the Swiss. Actually, last year Oracle was also defeated by the Swiss at their sole regatta in common: When Alinghi won in Cowes… Oracle brought 2 Volvo X40s there but none made the podium.
    Alinghi has shown what everyone already knew: That they can beat Oracle anytime, anywhere in any boat!
    That’s why Oracle wanted to race the DoG match before Alinghi could build his defending multihull: Because Oracle knows that if they race, Alinghi will win.
    This is also why now that Alinghi is ready for the DoG match Oracle has chnaged the speech: ” – Well… Huhh… If we win the court case we want to talk with Alinghi in order to avoid the DoG match…”
    Of course you want to avoid it. To avoid another defeat!

  2. Anonymous Says:

    11:14pm – Was great racing between Alinghi & BOR but it has absolutely nothing to due w/ why SNG, CNEV & GGYC is before the NYSC CoA. If you would view & listen to the NYSC CoA webcast you might understand what is going on.

    GGYC's offer of a Multi Challenge has been there since day one. It's only SNG that wants the challengers to sit on the hard.

    Defeat on the water, who cares, many of us just want the Deed protected from self serving Defenders who want to ignore the Deed & run the Challenger Selection Series as well.

    Btw hope you are proud of the way Alinghi acted at the LVPS. No wonder why they have such a bad sportsmanship profile in & out of sailing.

  3. Norberto Says:

    Poster 11.14pm – great comment! You have hit it on the nail perfectly. BOR know very well that they cannot win against Alinghi on the water. They have tried, and they have lost every time. The only option left is court. But why go to court if you are going to change your tune after all, and want to hold a perfectly normal AC like its been planned for months now?

    The BOR team has shown its incredible selfishness and arrogance by holding up a world class event for years (in order to protect the deed … oh yeah … what a crock of shite), and now they come back – after having lost AGAIN on the water – saying: well, maybe we didn’t mean it that way… maybe we can hold a normal AC after all.

    Larry and Tom are complete losers – on and off the water. A shame that the names of so many great American sailors have been dragged through the mud by one team owner who’s head has exploded because of his ego.

LV Pacific Series: Alinghi takes first blood in final against Emirates Team NZ

Posted on 13 February 2009 by Valencia Sailing

In a rematch of the America’s Cup races in Valencia in 2007, the first point went today to the America’s Cup holder, in brisk conditions.

According to Ray Davies, Emirates Team NZ tactician, his team executed the planned prestart procedure, seeking to position the boat on the pin end of the starting line because they thought it would be favored. In the 30 minutes preceding the start they had observed that trend and hoped it would continue. Unfortunately for them, it didn’t.

Ed Baird admitted not having a strong position in the prestart, he just found a hole on the line a placed the yacht but, more importantly, on the committee boat end. The wind didn’t finally shift left and the Swiss yacht was clearly in a more favorable position. They led throughout the first beat but could feel the Kiwis breathe on their neck. They rounded the top mark just 12 seconds ahead of them.

The race could have stayed very close and tight if it wasn’t for a slight crew error during a gybe on the New Zealand boat, proving once again that the Series will be won by the team that commits the least errors. The spinnaker halyard slipped, giving Alinghi a further precious 10 seconds of advantage. They rounded the leeward gate with a 20-second lead and form that point made an excellent job in covering the New Zealanders, never giving them the possibility to pass.

The Americas’ Cup holder crossed the finish line 22 seconds ahead of the Louis vuitton Cup winner.

After waiting until 3:30pm, Principal Race Officer Peter Reggio canceled the day’s sailing. With the breeze constantly close to 30 knots it was impossible to hold any further races.

My apologies for the photos, but it’s damn hard to sit on the bow of the umpire boat, taking pictures and making sure the camera doesn’t get soaked, with 25 knots of breeze and choppy seas.

Prestart of Race 1 of the Louis Vuitton Pacific Series final. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team New Zealand in the prestart procedure of the first race. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Alinghi takes the right side in the first beat. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

On the other hand, Emirates Team NZ looks for that left shift that never came. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

In the first crossing, Alinghi is already ahead. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Alinghi is comfortably ahead at the approach to the 1st weather mark. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ sailing towards the 1st weather mark. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ round the 1st weather mark. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Alinghi is leading the race at the beginning of the 1st run. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

While Alinghi is sailing smoothly in the 1st run…. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

… disaster strikes on the Emirates Team NZ boat. The spinnaker halyard slips. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Tense moments on the Emirates Team NZ boat as the spinnaker halyard slips. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Tense moments on the Emirates Team NZ boat as the spinnaker halyard slips. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Tense moments on the Emirates Team NZ boat as the spinnaker halyard slips. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ opts for the right buoy of the leeward gate. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Alinghi keep their lead in the 2nd beat. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team NZ round the 2nd top mark 25 seconds behind Alinghi. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Last leg of the race and Alinghi powers ahead. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

The America’s Cup holders sail flawlessly and pocket one point. Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

This Kiwi is smiling… Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

This Kiwi is not smiling… Auckland, 13 February 2009. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

6 Comments For This Post

  1. Anonymous Says:

    So the Swiss beat Oracle again. If I’m counting well, during this series in Auckland Oracle was defeated 3 times out of 3 by the Swiss. Actually, last year Oracle was also defeated by the Swiss at their sole regatta in common: When Alinghi won in Cowes… Oracle brought 2 Volvo X40s there but none made the podium.
    Alinghi has shown what everyone already knew: That they can beat Oracle anytime, anywhere in any boat!
    That’s why Oracle wanted to race the DoG match before Alinghi could build his defending multihull: Because Oracle knows that if they race, Alinghi will win.
    This is also why now that Alinghi is ready for the DoG match Oracle has chnaged the speech: ” – Well… Huhh… If we win the court case we want to talk with Alinghi in order to avoid the DoG match…”
    Of course you want to avoid it. To avoid another defeat!

  2. Anonymous Says:

    11:14pm – Was great racing between Alinghi & BOR but it has absolutely nothing to due w/ why SNG, CNEV & GGYC is before the NYSC CoA. If you would view & listen to the NYSC CoA webcast you might understand what is going on.

    GGYC's offer of a Multi Challenge has been there since day one. It's only SNG that wants the challengers to sit on the hard.

    Defeat on the water, who cares, many of us just want the Deed protected from self serving Defenders who want to ignore the Deed & run the Challenger Selection Series as well.

    Btw hope you are proud of the way Alinghi acted at the LVPS. No wonder why they have such a bad sportsmanship profile in & out of sailing.

  3. Norberto Says:

    Poster 11.14pm – great comment! You have hit it on the nail perfectly. BOR know very well that they cannot win against Alinghi on the water. They have tried, and they have lost every time. The only option left is court. But why go to court if you are going to change your tune after all, and want to hold a perfectly normal AC like its been planned for months now?

    The BOR team has shown its incredible selfishness and arrogance by holding up a world class event for years (in order to protect the deed … oh yeah … what a crock of shite), and now they come back – after having lost AGAIN on the water – saying: well, maybe we didn’t mean it that way… maybe we can hold a normal AC after all.

    Larry and Tom are complete losers – on and off the water. A shame that the names of so many great American sailors have been dragged through the mud by one team owner who’s head has exploded because of his ego.

  4. Anonymous Says:

    So the Swiss beat Oracle again. If I’m counting well, during this series in Auckland Oracle was defeated 3 times out of 3 by the Swiss. Actually, last year Oracle was also defeated by the Swiss at their sole regatta in common: When Alinghi won in Cowes… Oracle brought 2 Volvo X40s there but none made the podium.
    Alinghi has shown what everyone already knew: That they can beat Oracle anytime, anywhere in any boat!
    That’s why Oracle wanted to race the DoG match before Alinghi could build his defending multihull: Because Oracle knows that if they race, Alinghi will win.
    This is also why now that Alinghi is ready for the DoG match Oracle has chnaged the speech: ” – Well… Huhh… If we win the court case we want to talk with Alinghi in order to avoid the DoG match…”
    Of course you want to avoid it. To avoid another defeat!

  5. Anonymous Says:

    11:14pm – Was great racing between Alinghi & BOR but it has absolutely nothing to due w/ why SNG, CNEV & GGYC is before the NYSC CoA. If you would view & listen to the NYSC CoA webcast you might understand what is going on.

    GGYC's offer of a Multi Challenge has been there since day one. It's only SNG that wants the challengers to sit on the hard.

    Defeat on the water, who cares, many of us just want the Deed protected from self serving Defenders who want to ignore the Deed & run the Challenger Selection Series as well.

    Btw hope you are proud of the way Alinghi acted at the LVPS. No wonder why they have such a bad sportsmanship profile in & out of sailing.

  6. Norberto Says:

    Poster 11.14pm – great comment! You have hit it on the nail perfectly. BOR know very well that they cannot win against Alinghi on the water. They have tried, and they have lost every time. The only option left is court. But why go to court if you are going to change your tune after all, and want to hold a perfectly normal AC like its been planned for months now?

    The BOR team has shown its incredible selfishness and arrogance by holding up a world class event for years (in order to protect the deed … oh yeah … what a crock of shite), and now they come back – after having lost AGAIN on the water – saying: well, maybe we didn’t mean it that way… maybe we can hold a normal AC after all.

    Larry and Tom are complete losers – on and off the water. A shame that the names of so many great American sailors have been dragged through the mud by one team owner who’s head has exploded because of his ego.

Leave a comment





 

Sailing Calendar