Archive | November, 2008

Ericsson Racing Team wins Leg 2 of the Volvo Ocean Race

Posted on 29 November 2008 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Ericsson Racing Team] Ericsson Racing Team won Leg 2 of the Volvo Ocean Race today when Ericsson 4, skippered by Olympic gold medalist Torben Grael of Brazil, crossed the finish line at 04:22:30 local time, 2252:30 GMT on Nov. 29.

Ericsson 4 completed the 4,450-nautical-mile leg from Cape Town, South Africa, in 14 days, 11 hours, 32 minutes and 30 seconds. The crew earned 12 points on the leg – 8 points for the leg win and 4 points for first at the scoring gate. Ericsson 4 now has 26 points total and retains the fleet lead.

“Everybody’s very happy. It was a very tough leg with so many different conditions,” said Grael. “It’s just the beginning of the race, and there are some difficult legs ahead of us. A lot of unexpected things can happen, it’s good to be in the position we’re in.”

Ericsson 4 arrives in Cochin victorious. Cochin, 29 November 2008. Video copyright Ericsson Racing Team

Ericsson 4 had an adventurous leg, one that navigator Jules Salter described as beginning like a lion and ending like a lamb.

The first week was spent in rough conditions just north of 40S latitude, and the weather took a toll on both crew and gear. Sails were damaged and the crew suffered from lack of sleep, but Ericsson 4, a second generation Volvo Open 70 from designer Juan Kouyoumdjian, didn’t suffer any significant damage.

“We learned a lot from Juan K last time, and have taken that forward to this generation. We have a lot of confidence in the structure,” said David Endean, Ericsson 4 pit man and boat captain. “This generation of boat is stronger than the last.”

The International crew led the fleet past the scoring gate on Nov. 20, and then sprinted up the Indian Ocean to the Doldrums, swapping the lead with teammate Ericsson 3. Ericsson 4 made its break from the fleet on Thursday when it scampered through the Doldrums and then benefited from strong westerlies on the Equator.

Ericsson 4 arrives in Cochin victorious. Cochin, 29 November 2008. Video copyright Ericsson Racing Team

In the end, Ericsson 4 was made to wait painfully for this victory. It took nearly nine hours to complete the final 65 nautical miles, a snail’s pace for the speedy VO 70s. While they were drifting to the finish, the fleet was closing up from behind.

“We’re very happy to be here. Very relieved and very satisfied. Relief is a common emotion after how light it got at the end,” said watch captain Stu Bannatyne. “There’s always a risk to get overtaken when you park up. The others can see where you’re parked and it can all disappear very quickly. Fortunately we had enough.”

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Ericsson Racing Team wins Leg 2 of the Volvo Ocean Race

Posted on 29 November 2008 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Ericsson Racing Team] Ericsson Racing Team won Leg 2 of the Volvo Ocean Race today when Ericsson 4, skippered by Olympic gold medalist Torben Grael of Brazil, crossed the finish line at 04:22:30 local time, 2252:30 GMT on Nov. 29.

Ericsson 4 completed the 4,450-nautical-mile leg from Cape Town, South Africa, in 14 days, 11 hours, 32 minutes and 30 seconds. The crew earned 12 points on the leg – 8 points for the leg win and 4 points for first at the scoring gate. Ericsson 4 now has 26 points total and retains the fleet lead.

“Everybody’s very happy. It was a very tough leg with so many different conditions,” said Grael. “It’s just the beginning of the race, and there are some difficult legs ahead of us. A lot of unexpected things can happen, it’s good to be in the position we’re in.”

Ericsson 4 arrives in Cochin victorious. Cochin, 29 November 2008. Video copyright Ericsson Racing Team

Ericsson 4 had an adventurous leg, one that navigator Jules Salter described as beginning like a lion and ending like a lamb.

The first week was spent in rough conditions just north of 40S latitude, and the weather took a toll on both crew and gear. Sails were damaged and the crew suffered from lack of sleep, but Ericsson 4, a second generation Volvo Open 70 from designer Juan Kouyoumdjian, didn’t suffer any significant damage.

“We learned a lot from Juan K last time, and have taken that forward to this generation. We have a lot of confidence in the structure,” said David Endean, Ericsson 4 pit man and boat captain. “This generation of boat is stronger than the last.”

The International crew led the fleet past the scoring gate on Nov. 20, and then sprinted up the Indian Ocean to the Doldrums, swapping the lead with teammate Ericsson 3. Ericsson 4 made its break from the fleet on Thursday when it scampered through the Doldrums and then benefited from strong westerlies on the Equator.

Ericsson 4 arrives in Cochin victorious. Cochin, 29 November 2008. Video copyright Ericsson Racing Team

In the end, Ericsson 4 was made to wait painfully for this victory. It took nearly nine hours to complete the final 65 nautical miles, a snail’s pace for the speedy VO 70s. While they were drifting to the finish, the fleet was closing up from behind.

“We’re very happy to be here. Very relieved and very satisfied. Relief is a common emotion after how light it got at the end,” said watch captain Stu Bannatyne. “There’s always a risk to get overtaken when you park up. The others can see where you’re parked and it can all disappear very quickly. Fortunately we had enough.”

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Dean Barker crowned NZ Match Racing champion

Posted on 29 November 2008 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: RNZYS] The fourth and final day of the New Zealand Match Racing Championships was held in extremely frustrating conditions for the competitors and the Race Committee alike. A light southerly breeze prevailed for most of the day but was very shifty, so the volunteers aboard the mark laying boats work hard to maintain a fair and equal course.

The three remaining flights of the second round robin were completed in the morning, as the final charges for the four semi final places began. It was a tight contest between the leading six teams, and the day was sparked by an upsetting race for Dean Barker, when his winning streak was cut short by Ben Ainslie who beat him by 30 seconds. Rod Davis claimed a win over Adam Minoprio, whilst Laurie Jury beat Adrian Short, securing his spot in the semi finals. Minoprio fought back hard in the next flight, clawing a vital point back with an impressive win over Ben Ainslie. Minoprio then went onto beat Dean Barker in the following flight; however it wasn’t quite enough to see him through to the final four.

Phil Robertson’s last hopes of making the semi finals were dashed by Laurie Jury, who beat Phil and put him out of the running for the top four. With Rod Davis securing a spot in semis, the four teams were decided. Ainslie, Barker, Jury, and Davis were then to fight it out for the match racing title.

Barker won the first race of the semi finals against Jury, who put up a fight in the second race to equal the scores. However the third race saw Barker into the finals and it was Ben Ainslie who was going to match him. After defeating Rod Davis, Ainslie took his spot in the final two, and it was all on from there!

The petit finals and finals saw some close racing as teams battled to get the 1st and 3rd placing. Jury had two wins over Davis, putting him in third place overall, whilst Barker had three consecutive wins over Ainslie, giving him the Auckland Match Racing Cup and making him the 2008 New Zealand Match Racing Championships winner.

With a day to spare the regatta came to end, with a forecast of very light winds tomorrow, the Race Committee was pleased to complete two round robins, semi finals and finals within four days. A very successful event, and after four exhausting days, the sailors, umpires, race committee, and all the volunteers will sleep well tonight. We’re looking forward to another exciting regatta next year!

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Dean Barker crowned NZ Match Racing champion

Posted on 29 November 2008 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: RNZYS] The fourth and final day of the New Zealand Match Racing Championships was held in extremely frustrating conditions for the competitors and the Race Committee alike. A light southerly breeze prevailed for most of the day but was very shifty, so the volunteers aboard the mark laying boats work hard to maintain a fair and equal course.

The three remaining flights of the second round robin were completed in the morning, as the final charges for the four semi final places began. It was a tight contest between the leading six teams, and the day was sparked by an upsetting race for Dean Barker, when his winning streak was cut short by Ben Ainslie who beat him by 30 seconds. Rod Davis claimed a win over Adam Minoprio, whilst Laurie Jury beat Adrian Short, securing his spot in the semi finals. Minoprio fought back hard in the next flight, clawing a vital point back with an impressive win over Ben Ainslie. Minoprio then went onto beat Dean Barker in the following flight; however it wasn’t quite enough to see him through to the final four.

Phil Robertson’s last hopes of making the semi finals were dashed by Laurie Jury, who beat Phil and put him out of the running for the top four. With Rod Davis securing a spot in semis, the four teams were decided. Ainslie, Barker, Jury, and Davis were then to fight it out for the match racing title.

Barker won the first race of the semi finals against Jury, who put up a fight in the second race to equal the scores. However the third race saw Barker into the finals and it was Ben Ainslie who was going to match him. After defeating Rod Davis, Ainslie took his spot in the final two, and it was all on from there!

The petit finals and finals saw some close racing as teams battled to get the 1st and 3rd placing. Jury had two wins over Davis, putting him in third place overall, whilst Barker had three consecutive wins over Ainslie, giving him the Auckland Match Racing Cup and making him the 2008 New Zealand Match Racing Championships winner.

With a day to spare the regatta came to end, with a forecast of very light winds tomorrow, the Race Committee was pleased to complete two round robins, semi finals and finals within four days. A very successful event, and after four exhausting days, the sailors, umpires, race committee, and all the volunteers will sleep well tonight. We’re looking forward to another exciting regatta next year!

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Sébastien Josse leading the Vendée Globe, at least for now..

Posted on 28 November 2008 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Vendée Globe] Like birds migrating south, the leading bunch seem have fallen neatly into each other’s slipstreams as they head down the latitudes, with Sébastien Josse showing the way.

No change among the front-runners at this evening’s update (1900hrs GMT): first placed Seb Josse has pulled a couple more miles out on Loick Peyron, whilst the distance to the next seven boats has increased marginally as their VMG picks up again. But if the speeds are picking up, what does that mean for the St Helena High?

Most of the skippers are playing their cards close to their chest, but we can certainly expect another day or two of unsettled weather as they cross the high pressure zone. After last night’s swing to the south, the predictions are for the wind to start backing northerly. When the westerlies will kick in is still open to speculation! With nine hours between scheds overnight, this could be a real opportunity for some night manoeuvring — we won’t know who comes out best until 0400h (GMT) tomorrow.

Highlights from day 19 of the Vendée Globe. 28 November 2008. Video copyright Vendée Globe

Some of the positions are a little misrepresentative of where the skippers are in the real race — the race to get south. For example, ninth placed Mike Golding (Ecover, GBR) is 55 miles further south than Jean Le Cam in fourth. Le Cam’s radical south-easterly track appears to have been a temporary hitch in response to a shift, and he is now on a similar heading to the rest of the fleet.

In fact the boat closest to Le Cam’s latitude is 10th-placed Safran (Marc Guillemot), who made rapid progress south over the past couple of days and looks set to rejoin the leading group. Few would even rule out that Michel Desjoyeaux, currently in 14th, could catch the front-runners — Foncia is now around 55 miles further south than Sam Davies (GBR), but approx 125 miles to the west, which means that the Roxy skipper is showing as one place ahead. Swiss sailor Bernard Stamm is currently barreling down the track most rapidly, taking 120 miles from the leaders in the past 24 hours in Cheminées Poujoulat in 22nd place.

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Sébastien Josse leading the Vendée Globe, at least for now..

Posted on 28 November 2008 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Vendée Globe] Like birds migrating south, the leading bunch seem have fallen neatly into each other’s slipstreams as they head down the latitudes, with Sébastien Josse showing the way.

No change among the front-runners at this evening’s update (1900hrs GMT): first placed Seb Josse has pulled a couple more miles out on Loick Peyron, whilst the distance to the next seven boats has increased marginally as their VMG picks up again. But if the speeds are picking up, what does that mean for the St Helena High?

Most of the skippers are playing their cards close to their chest, but we can certainly expect another day or two of unsettled weather as they cross the high pressure zone. After last night’s swing to the south, the predictions are for the wind to start backing northerly. When the westerlies will kick in is still open to speculation! With nine hours between scheds overnight, this could be a real opportunity for some night manoeuvring — we won’t know who comes out best until 0400h (GMT) tomorrow.

Highlights from day 19 of the Vendée Globe. 28 November 2008. Video copyright Vendée Globe

Some of the positions are a little misrepresentative of where the skippers are in the real race — the race to get south. For example, ninth placed Mike Golding (Ecover, GBR) is 55 miles further south than Jean Le Cam in fourth. Le Cam’s radical south-easterly track appears to have been a temporary hitch in response to a shift, and he is now on a similar heading to the rest of the fleet.

In fact the boat closest to Le Cam’s latitude is 10th-placed Safran (Marc Guillemot), who made rapid progress south over the past couple of days and looks set to rejoin the leading group. Few would even rule out that Michel Desjoyeaux, currently in 14th, could catch the front-runners — Foncia is now around 55 miles further south than Sam Davies (GBR), but approx 125 miles to the west, which means that the Roxy skipper is showing as one place ahead. Swiss sailor Bernard Stamm is currently barreling down the track most rapidly, taking 120 miles from the leaders in the past 24 hours in Cheminées Poujoulat in 22nd place.

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BMW Oracle successfully completes trimaran trials

Posted on 28 November 2008 by Valencia Sailing

BMW ORACLE RACING’S TRIMARAN SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETES

PHASE I OF SEA TRIALS IN SAN DIEGO

– State-of-the-Art Trimaran Will Undergo Modifications to Improve Performance and Start Phase II Sea Trials in San Diego in Late January

– BMW ORACLE Explores New Racing Options for Trimaran

San Diego, California, November 28, 2008 – Russell Coutts, CEO and Skipper of BMW ORACLE Racing, today announced that BOR 90, the syndicate’s state-of-the-art trimaran, has successfully completed Phase I of its sea trials in San Diego.

The 90 foot high-tech trimaran now will undergo further modifications to improve performance based on the team’s experiences with the trimaran on the Pacific Ocean off California since October. Over the next few months, a number of design changes will be implemented in order to make the trimaran an even faster, more responsive boat. In addition, decisions will be made about the optimum crew size and placement.

The boat will return to the water in late January for several additional months of testing in San Diego.

Archive footage from the construction of the trimaran. Video copyright BMW Oracle

Said Coutts, “We’ve had some great sailing over the past seven weeks. Our team worked hard and pushed the limits of the boat, identifying its many strengths as well as several areas where it needs improvement. We saw it can consistently sail one-and-a-half to two times the speed of the wind, regardless of sea and wind conditions, and it has remarkable agility. Overall, it’s an amazing machine – none of us have ever sailed anything like it. Its extreme engineering enables extreme performance.”

Coutts also announced that BMW ORACLE had begun to explore opportunities to race the trimaran. “Our racing options for sailing a multihull are not limited to the America’s Cup. Indeed, a Deed of Gift race is only a default option forced on us if Alinghi declines to agree to a multi-challenger event after we win the appeal. It remains our hope that we will reach an agreement with the America’s Cup Defender that will enable a traditional, multi-challenger America’s Cup in monohulls.

The BMW Oracle trimaran sailing in San Diego. Photo copyright Gilles Martin-Raget / BMW Oracle

“With that in mind, we are exploring a number of other ways to sail the boat, including match races, regattas or even an attempt at one of the sailing speed records,” he said.

Coutts added, “On behalf of all of us at BMW ORACLE Racing, I want to thank the people of San Diego – the reception we’ve gotten from the sailing community and everyone else has been wonderful.”

The Phase I sea trials followed several weeks of “shake-down” testing in Puget Sound off Anacortes, WA earlier in September.

The BMW Oracle trimaran sailing in San Diego. Photo copyright Gilles Martin-Raget / BMW Oracle

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BMW Oracle successfully completes trimaran trials

Posted on 28 November 2008 by Valencia Sailing

BMW ORACLE RACING’S TRIMARAN SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETES

PHASE I OF SEA TRIALS IN SAN DIEGO

– State-of-the-Art Trimaran Will Undergo Modifications to Improve Performance and Start Phase II Sea Trials in San Diego in Late January

– BMW ORACLE Explores New Racing Options for Trimaran

San Diego, California, November 28, 2008 – Russell Coutts, CEO and Skipper of BMW ORACLE Racing, today announced that BOR 90, the syndicate’s state-of-the-art trimaran, has successfully completed Phase I of its sea trials in San Diego.

The 90 foot high-tech trimaran now will undergo further modifications to improve performance based on the team’s experiences with the trimaran on the Pacific Ocean off California since October. Over the next few months, a number of design changes will be implemented in order to make the trimaran an even faster, more responsive boat. In addition, decisions will be made about the optimum crew size and placement.

The boat will return to the water in late January for several additional months of testing in San Diego.

Archive footage from the construction of the trimaran. Video copyright BMW Oracle

Said Coutts, “We’ve had some great sailing over the past seven weeks. Our team worked hard and pushed the limits of the boat, identifying its many strengths as well as several areas where it needs improvement. We saw it can consistently sail one-and-a-half to two times the speed of the wind, regardless of sea and wind conditions, and it has remarkable agility. Overall, it’s an amazing machine – none of us have ever sailed anything like it. Its extreme engineering enables extreme performance.”

Coutts also announced that BMW ORACLE had begun to explore opportunities to race the trimaran. “Our racing options for sailing a multihull are not limited to the America’s Cup. Indeed, a Deed of Gift race is only a default option forced on us if Alinghi declines to agree to a multi-challenger event after we win the appeal. It remains our hope that we will reach an agreement with the America’s Cup Defender that will enable a traditional, multi-challenger America’s Cup in monohulls.

The BMW Oracle trimaran sailing in San Diego. Photo copyright Gilles Martin-Raget / BMW Oracle

“With that in mind, we are exploring a number of other ways to sail the boat, including match races, regattas or even an attempt at one of the sailing speed records,” he said.

Coutts added, “On behalf of all of us at BMW ORACLE Racing, I want to thank the people of San Diego – the reception we’ve gotten from the sailing community and everyone else has been wonderful.”

The Phase I sea trials followed several weeks of “shake-down” testing in Puget Sound off Anacortes, WA earlier in September.

The BMW Oracle trimaran sailing in San Diego. Photo copyright Gilles Martin-Raget / BMW Oracle

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