Archive | September, 2007

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Jonathan McKee talks about the Barcelona World Race and his team Estrella Damm

Posted on 27 September 2007 by Valencia Sailing

Right after the presentation of Estrella Damm’s boat and team, we spoke to Jonathan McKee, the American sailor that together with Guillermo Altadill will start off Barcelona next November and sail around the world.

Valencia Sailing: After a successful America’s Cup with Luna Rossa, you choose a completely different path. Why?
Jonathan McKee I really enjoyed the America’s Cup as well as my experience with Luna Rossa but I always wanted to experience different styles of sailing and races and put myself in different situations. For me this is an opportunity to do something completely different. This type of ocean racing, especially short handed ocean racing is something I have some experience with and which appeals to me a lot. One thing that’s great about it is how different it is compared to the America’s Cup, not only in the sailing itself but in that the team is so much smaller and I can be much more involved in its overall decision-making and its personality. An individual sailor rarely has this involvement in the America’s Cup.

Valencia Sailing: You’ll be just two persons sailing together for more than three months. Can this lead to conflicts or problems?
Jonathan McKee For sure it’s difficult and can create conflicts. I’ll have less time with my family; I have a wife and two children and it’s not going to be easy being away for three months. Luckily there is technology that helps in that sense a little bit but still it’s a long time. That’s a positive aspect of the America’s Cup, you can go home every night and be with your family. It’s a much more family-friendly environment. On the other side, this race will be over quite quickly. It lasts three months, it finishes an then you are on to your next assignment, while the America’s Cup last almost 4 years.

Valencia Sailing: Why did you specifically choose the Barcelona World Race and not the Volvo Ocean Race or any other round-the-world race?
Jonathan McKee For me the idea of going double-handed is much more appealing than going single-handed. Compared to the Vendée Globe this is a much more interesting race and more fun. You have more sleep, you share the duties and responsibilities and I’m sure I’ll enjoy it more. As to the Volvo Ocean Race, I also think it’s a very interesting one; it has a different dynamic with more crew, in-port races and stopovers. It’s also a much longer race. It’s an appealing challenge as well and it’s not out of question I would do it also.

Valencia Sailing: What’s your view on the boats of the race, the IMOCA Open 60?
Jonathan McKee I think that technically they are very interesting boats and it’s a very open design platform. Don’t forget that a lot of the big developments in sailing have been pioneered in this class and if you look at the boats they are really incredible ocean racing machines. Having being around for quite a lot of time they are very refined now. They have become more powerful which makes it more difficult for the single-handed type of sailing and better suited to the double-handed. Still the sails are big and moving them around, putting them up or down is a big challenge in a race for only two sailors. That will be one of the big challenges of the race. Nevertheless, they are really fun to sail and just the sensation of sailing them, the speeds achieved is very appealing.

Valencia Sailing: Are there big difference among the 9 boats of the race, at least you are aware of? Better said, do you expect to see big difference?
Jonathan McKee That remains to be seen! Seven of the boats are basically new. Between these latest-generation boats differences will be small. Some will probably be more prepared than others. Some have been on the water for a longer time while some are simply further along on their development cycle. There are two older boats that will certainly be improved but speed wise they are probably not as quick as the newer ones.

Valencia Sailing: So, is this a technology race or a human one? How important is the human factor?
Jonathan McKee The human factor certainly outweighs the technology factor by a big margin. In a race like this, the technology comes in more in the reliability of the boat rather than its pure speed. Very often you are not at 100% of efficiency or capacity. As I said, the new boats will be reasonably close in speed. Probably some boats will have their strong points in an area or another, depending on how they are set up, their sail plan but in the end it’s more about the people and how they sail the boat, the seamanship and probably more than anything is the preparation. If you can make it around without any major breakage, that’s a huge part of this race.

Valencia Sailing: How difficult is the route the organizers have chosen? What is its trickiest point? Approximately half of the race will be around Antarctica.
Jonathan McKee Yes, you do go around Antarctica. For sure it will be one of the most challenging parts of the race but mainly from a pure endurance standpoint. There is a lot of wind, waves and it’s really cold and very isolated. That part of the race is hard although not technically challenging. I think the Atlantic part of the race is more likely where you win or lose overall. You can gain a lot of miles by good tactical choices. Being at the right place at the right time can mean hundreds of miles whereas in the southern ocean it’s more about seamanship, keeping the boat together and a consistent pace and above all avoid any breakages.

Valencia Sailing: In what stage are your preparations for the race, 6 weeks before its start.
Jonathan McKee We are now at the final stages of our preparation. We are trying to focus on improving some of the systems of the boat and their reliability. We haven’t sailed the boat as much as we would have liked either and we are still learning how to sail it. There is still a number of things to do and as a result we are having a tight schedule for the next 6 weeks.

Valencia Sailing: Finally, you had to abandon the Rolex Fastnet last August because of problems with the keel. What’s the situation now?
Jonathan McKee We think the problem has been solved and we have taken care of that issue. Since that incident we sailed 4,000 miles. It was not a structural issue, it was electronics.

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Estrella Damm present their boat for the Barcelona World Race

Posted on 27 September 2007 by Valencia Sailing

Estrella Damm officially presented their IMOCA Open 60 boat and its team, comprising of sailors Guillermo Altadill and Jonathan McKee. The Spanish and American will compete in the Barcelona World Race, a two-handed round-the-world race that will start in the Spanish city on November 11.

Estrella Damm officially present their IMOCA Open 60 boat for the Barcelona World Race. Barcelona, 27 September 2007. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Estrella Damm officially present their IMOCA Open 60 boat for the Barcelona World Race. Barcelona, 27 September 2007. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Estrella Damm officially present their IMOCA Open 60 boat for the Barcelona World Race. Barcelona, 27 September 2007. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Estrella Damm officially present their IMOCA Open 60 boat for the Barcelona World Race. Barcelona, 27 September 2007. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Estrella Damm officially present their IMOCA Open 60 boat for the Barcelona World Race. Barcelona, 27 September 2007. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Estrella Damm officially present their IMOCA Open 60 boat for the Barcelona World Race. Barcelona, 27 September 2007. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Estrella Damm officially present their IMOCA Open 60 boat for the Barcelona World Race. Barcelona, 27 September 2007. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Estrella Damm officially present their IMOCA Open 60 boat for the Barcelona World Race. Barcelona, 27 September 2007. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

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Alinghi’s Simon Daubney breached America’s Cup Anti Doping Rules

Posted on 27 September 2007 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Alinghi] Statement from Simon Daubney: “Yesterday I went before the five-man 32nd America’s Cup Jury in London regarding a positive doping test taken on 23 June 2007. While Anti Doping Norway did find traces of a recreational drug in the urine sample, the Jury found that there was no fault or negligence on my behalf. This comes as a relief to me as I have never knowingly taken a banned substance however, until this matter is completely resolved, I have resigned from Alinghi, so that they can go about their business without distraction. I hope to return to the team once my name is cleared.

I was found in breach of the America’s Cup Anti Doping Rules after a routine urine test taken by Anti Doping Norway on 23 June 2007. The urine sample returned a positive test for a recreational drug on 13 July 2007. Then the B sample returned a positive result on the 8 August.

I have been bound by confidentiality rules up until now and want to take this opportunity to thank Alinghi and my family and friends for their enormous support during this extremely difficult time. I have done everything in my power to prove that I have never knowingly taken a banned substance of any type and to this end underwent and passed a polygraph test conducted by the UK and European Polygraph Association. I am heartened and relieved that the Jury agrees with my contention that I was a victim of contamination and or drink spiking.”

Brad Butterworth, Alinghi team skipper comments: “It was unfortunate that Simon had to go through this unpleasant experience, and both his friends and I have fully supported him from the outset. We welcome the Jury findings that there ‘was no fault or negligence on behalf of Simon’. He is a valued team member and close friend and we feel for him and his family having endured this difficult time. Alinghi does wish to make clear that the team in no way condones the use of any drugs.”

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Estrella Damm present their boat for the Barcelona World Race

Posted on 27 September 2007 by Valencia Sailing

Estrella Damm officially presented their IMOCA Open 60 boat and its team, comprising of sailors Guillermo Altadill and Jonathan McKee. The Spanish and American will compete in the Barcelona World Race, a two-handed round-the-world race that will start in the Spanish city on November 11.

Estrella Damm officially present their IMOCA Open 60 boat for the Barcelona World Race. Barcelona, 27 September 2007. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Estrella Damm officially present their IMOCA Open 60 boat for the Barcelona World Race. Barcelona, 27 September 2007. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Estrella Damm officially present their IMOCA Open 60 boat for the Barcelona World Race. Barcelona, 27 September 2007. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Estrella Damm officially present their IMOCA Open 60 boat for the Barcelona World Race. Barcelona, 27 September 2007. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Estrella Damm officially present their IMOCA Open 60 boat for the Barcelona World Race. Barcelona, 27 September 2007. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Estrella Damm officially present their IMOCA Open 60 boat for the Barcelona World Race. Barcelona, 27 September 2007. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Estrella Damm officially present their IMOCA Open 60 boat for the Barcelona World Race. Barcelona, 27 September 2007. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

Estrella Damm officially present their IMOCA Open 60 boat for the Barcelona World Race. Barcelona, 27 September 2007. Photo copyright Pierre Orphanidis / Valencia Sailing

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Alinghi’s Simon Daubney breached America’s Cup Anti Doping Rules

Posted on 27 September 2007 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Alinghi] Statement from Simon Daubney: “Yesterday I went before the five-man 32nd America’s Cup Jury in London regarding a positive doping test taken on 23 June 2007. While Anti Doping Norway did find traces of a recreational drug in the urine sample, the Jury found that there was no fault or negligence on my behalf. This comes as a relief to me as I have never knowingly taken a banned substance however, until this matter is completely resolved, I have resigned from Alinghi, so that they can go about their business without distraction. I hope to return to the team once my name is cleared.

I was found in breach of the America’s Cup Anti Doping Rules after a routine urine test taken by Anti Doping Norway on 23 June 2007. The urine sample returned a positive test for a recreational drug on 13 July 2007. Then the B sample returned a positive result on the 8 August.

I have been bound by confidentiality rules up until now and want to take this opportunity to thank Alinghi and my family and friends for their enormous support during this extremely difficult time. I have done everything in my power to prove that I have never knowingly taken a banned substance of any type and to this end underwent and passed a polygraph test conducted by the UK and European Polygraph Association. I am heartened and relieved that the Jury agrees with my contention that I was a victim of contamination and or drink spiking.”

Brad Butterworth, Alinghi team skipper comments: “It was unfortunate that Simon had to go through this unpleasant experience, and both his friends and I have fully supported him from the outset. We welcome the Jury findings that there ‘was no fault or negligence on behalf of Simon’. He is a valued team member and close friend and we feel for him and his family having endured this difficult time. Alinghi does wish to make clear that the team in no way condones the use of any drugs.”

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Racing cancelled Rolex TP 52 Global Championship due to strong winds

Posted on 26 September 2007 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Rolex TP52 Global Championship] With the dogs well and truly blown off the chains, racing at the Rolex TP52 Global Championship was very sensibly cancelled for the day. The sense of relief amongst the experienced crews was palpable; with gusts in the Straits of Bonifacio clocking 50 knots and winds gusting more than 30 forecast to extend over the entire available race area by this afternoon, these are boat and crew breaking conditions.

A quick look out to sea at breakfast time this morning was enough to get even the most hardened ocean-racers choking on their cornflakes. By lunch-time it was even worse and the whistling in the rigging was beginning to get on everyone’s nerves. For Principal Race Officer, Peter Craig, who has run grand-prix racing at the top level for many years it was a very simple decision, finally made at 10.30 this morning, “when we looked at the situation first thing it was blowing 20-25 knots in the race area and more up in the Straits. We sent a boat out a short while ago to get an update and winds had increased to gusts of 30 just off Porto Cervo. The local experts advise that the pressure seen in the Straits will move over us during the day, so it will just get windier.” Craig and event organizers, the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, have already got five races in the bag and with good racing conditions predicted for tomorrow and beyond, there was no pressure to get any racing in today. “It’s better to have all boats on the start line tomorrow,” added Craig.

John Cook, owner of Cristabella (GBR) and newly elected President of the TP52 Class Association, agreed wholeheartedly with the decision to preserve the fleet, “I have no doubt it is a sensible decision, we’re out here to race and to enjoy ourselves, not to break our boats. Racing on the Costa Smeralda is always very exciting because often the wind blows off the land and you’ve got flat water, which makes for highly competitive racing. On the other hand it can blow like hell and you don’t want to break your boat, so I’m sure the decision was very wise.”

Ray Davies, a Volvo Ocean Race winner and weather expert on ETNZ at the Cup, is tactician on Peter de Ridder’s Mean Machine (MON), which currently lies in third overall after two steady days of racing. Davies was equally supportive of the decision, “I completely agree with the decision taken by the race committee to cancel the coastal race today. The weather forecast predicts a really windy day and to go racing would simply mean broken gear.” Not ones for sitting by the pool on an enforced rest day, Davies and crew have other ideas, “the Mean Machine team has an alternative plan: go windsurfing this afternoon and make the most fun of these conditions!”

Weather expert, Major Filippo Petrucci forecasts improved conditions tomorrow. The wind is expected to drop in strength as it rotates left to the southwest, but will still be in the 15-20 knot range. The wind direction will return to the northwest in the afternoon, increasing in strength by the evening, but hopefully not to today’s extreme level.

Last night the owners gathered for the TP52 Class Association annual meeting. A number of significant measures were adopted aimed at preserving the success and longevity of the class by providing a stable platform for the future. Of note, changes to the bylaws and a rules were approved that will allow further discussion with ISAF to enable the TP52 to become a recognised Class. A new structure has been put in place to move the Class smoothly from an Executive Director led organisation to one that is fully member owned and run. In recognition of his efforts on behalf of the Class, since its inception, Tom Pollack was voted the first Honorary Life Member. At the same point in proceedings, an Executive Committee was formed and John Cook was voted unanimously to be the first Class President. Other moves made will see the Class take steps to fully manage its commercial and image rights for the benefit of owners, sponsors and event organizers. The Class is to embark upon a yearlong research process into the updating of the TP52 box rule, with a view to establishing a revised version for the next ten years. The research will be far reaching and involve input from selected designers, who will be given a brief on the areas of the box rule that need consideration. Any changes adopted are unlikely to be finalised before 2009 or implemented before 2010. Of particular relevance to the future of this event, there was unanimous agreement to lift the restriction on the eligibility of helmsman. The Class rules will become Open on this point, although there will be a Corinthian Driver category within Class competitions.

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Racing cancelled Rolex TP 52 Global Championship due to strong winds

Posted on 26 September 2007 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Rolex TP52 Global Championship] With the dogs well and truly blown off the chains, racing at the Rolex TP52 Global Championship was very sensibly cancelled for the day. The sense of relief amongst the experienced crews was palpable; with gusts in the Straits of Bonifacio clocking 50 knots and winds gusting more than 30 forecast to extend over the entire available race area by this afternoon, these are boat and crew breaking conditions.

A quick look out to sea at breakfast time this morning was enough to get even the most hardened ocean-racers choking on their cornflakes. By lunch-time it was even worse and the whistling in the rigging was beginning to get on everyone’s nerves. For Principal Race Officer, Peter Craig, who has run grand-prix racing at the top level for many years it was a very simple decision, finally made at 10.30 this morning, “when we looked at the situation first thing it was blowing 20-25 knots in the race area and more up in the Straits. We sent a boat out a short while ago to get an update and winds had increased to gusts of 30 just off Porto Cervo. The local experts advise that the pressure seen in the Straits will move over us during the day, so it will just get windier.” Craig and event organizers, the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, have already got five races in the bag and with good racing conditions predicted for tomorrow and beyond, there was no pressure to get any racing in today. “It’s better to have all boats on the start line tomorrow,” added Craig.

John Cook, owner of Cristabella (GBR) and newly elected President of the TP52 Class Association, agreed wholeheartedly with the decision to preserve the fleet, “I have no doubt it is a sensible decision, we’re out here to race and to enjoy ourselves, not to break our boats. Racing on the Costa Smeralda is always very exciting because often the wind blows off the land and you’ve got flat water, which makes for highly competitive racing. On the other hand it can blow like hell and you don’t want to break your boat, so I’m sure the decision was very wise.”

Ray Davies, a Volvo Ocean Race winner and weather expert on ETNZ at the Cup, is tactician on Peter de Ridder’s Mean Machine (MON), which currently lies in third overall after two steady days of racing. Davies was equally supportive of the decision, “I completely agree with the decision taken by the race committee to cancel the coastal race today. The weather forecast predicts a really windy day and to go racing would simply mean broken gear.” Not ones for sitting by the pool on an enforced rest day, Davies and crew have other ideas, “the Mean Machine team has an alternative plan: go windsurfing this afternoon and make the most fun of these conditions!”

Weather expert, Major Filippo Petrucci forecasts improved conditions tomorrow. The wind is expected to drop in strength as it rotates left to the southwest, but will still be in the 15-20 knot range. The wind direction will return to the northwest in the afternoon, increasing in strength by the evening, but hopefully not to today’s extreme level.

Last night the owners gathered for the TP52 Class Association annual meeting. A number of significant measures were adopted aimed at preserving the success and longevity of the class by providing a stable platform for the future. Of note, changes to the bylaws and a rules were approved that will allow further discussion with ISAF to enable the TP52 to become a recognised Class. A new structure has been put in place to move the Class smoothly from an Executive Director led organisation to one that is fully member owned and run. In recognition of his efforts on behalf of the Class, since its inception, Tom Pollack was voted the first Honorary Life Member. At the same point in proceedings, an Executive Committee was formed and John Cook was voted unanimously to be the first Class President. Other moves made will see the Class take steps to fully manage its commercial and image rights for the benefit of owners, sponsors and event organizers. The Class is to embark upon a yearlong research process into the updating of the TP52 box rule, with a view to establishing a revised version for the next ten years. The research will be far reaching and involve input from selected designers, who will be given a brief on the areas of the box rule that need consideration. Any changes adopted are unlikely to be finalised before 2009 or implemented before 2010. Of particular relevance to the future of this event, there was unanimous agreement to lift the restriction on the eligibility of helmsman. The Class rules will become Open on this point, although there will be a Corinthian Driver category within Class competitions.

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Artemis grabs leadership at Rolex TP52 Global Championship

Posted on 25 September 2007 by Valencia Sailing

[Source: Rolex TP52 Global Championship] King of Cool or lucky break? That is the question. Whatever the real answer, the positions at the end of Day Two and Race Five of the Rolex TP52 Global Championship 2007 do not lie. Artemis (SWE) sits on top of the heap with a healthy ten-point margin over second placed Patches (IRE). It could have been worse or better for both. Patches caught over the start line in the first two races of the day and Artemis over early in the third. Both completed recoveries that in the case of Artemis suggested true genius at the core – the genius of Russell Coutts – along with a measure of good boat speed and probably some luck.

Master magician onboard or not, Torbjorn Tornqvist’s Artemis was comprehensively boat of the day posting a 1, 2, 4. Not far behind in that category was Stuart Robinson’s Stay Calm (GBR), which managed to avoid any issues with the line, and scored 2, 4, 3 to move into fourth overall. The two other race winners were Doug DeVos’ Windquest (USA)with Terry Hutchinson calling the shots and, of course, Eamon Conneely’s Patches which, after her problems with the first two starts of the day, stormed around the final course like a scalded cat to finish someway in front of Alberto Roemmers’ Siemens.

Start of the races in the second day of the Rolex TP52 Global Championship. Porto Cervo, 25 September 2007. Photo copyright Carlo Borlenghi / Rolex

The three races were held in a fresh northwesterly. The promised rotation from the northeast arrived early and the race committee got off the daily maximum number of windward/leewards in short order. The steadiness of the breeze reflected in a lack of any course changes. The first race involved a 2 nautical mile leg in 12 – 15 knots, whilst the second and third saw a 2.4 nm leg and the wind topping out at around 20 knots on the final run home. Normal Porto Cervo service well and truly resumed, with a bright clear sky and plenty of sunshine.

What a difference a day makes. At 2.15pm yesterday the first race was just getting underway in miserable conditions. By that time today, yesterday’s problems were forgotten and the crews were halfway through the second race and, if you really want to know how exciting the racing was today, phone a friend. Hopefully, one onboard of a competing yacht, but if not, perhaps one on the fleet of spectator, support, media and committee boats that hared up and down the course all day stopping only to gawp at the mark roundings. Otherwise look at the pictures, shut your eyes and imagine sound of sheets screeching as grinders wring the last few millimetres out of the resisting sheets as the boats round the leeward mark or trimmers ease the taut, loaded membranes at the top mark. Trying to bottle or distil the intensity of these moments is all but impossible.

Doug DeVos’ Windquest during the second day of the Rolex TP52 Global Championship. Porto Cervo, 25 September 2007. Photo copyright Carlo Borlenghi / Rolex

Stuart Robinson, owner and helm of Stay Calm described their day, “a great day’s sailing. Warm, sunny and wind. We had good starts which obviously helps, while a lot of people were over (early) which was surprising, but we made use of that. We had good boat speed and generally sailed much better than yesterday, managing to keep pretty clean.” Robinson clearly thoroughly enjoys sailing the TP52, “it’s just like a big dinghy and with a tiller you get quite into it! The tiller is harder than the wheel, but more responsive. You certainly feel when there is load on it, but it is good fun hanging off that. We’re sailing the boat quite aggressively downwind and we hit 18 knots on the last run when the breeze came up. We really pushed it on that leg and we almost got to Siemens in second who had been quite far ahead. Andy Hemmings joined us from Team New Zealand this year and is doing an excellent job trimming.”

First race of the day was pretty straightforward, unless you were Patches, Fram XVI (NOR), Siemens (ESP) or Mutua Madrilena (CHI) – all caught over the line early and forced to return. By the time they were back in the contest, Artemis and Stay Calm had established their authority over the rest of the fleet and went on to finish in that order – the Swedish boat some 35 seconds ahead. John Buchan’s Glory (USA) had her best result of the day coming home in third after a great scrap with John Cook’s Cristabella (GBR), probably still smarting after being disqualified in the second race yesterday. Patches recovered to ninth after some fine work on the second windward leg.

Second race, and yet again Patches and Mutua Madrilena found themselves ahead of the game at the start – this time with DSK Comifin (POR), Cristabella and Anonimo Q8 (ITA). Mutua recovered the best coming home in seventh, the product of good work upwind and downwind. Nacho Postigo, navigator on the Chilean boat commented, ” today we have had to make nice recoveries from bad positions. The boat is travelling very nicely on the water even in strong wind and we have been very happy with the speed and the tactical decisions. But starting last and rounding the first mark last is very hard to come back with this fleet.” At the front, Windquest led from start to finish as Artemis followed her around. For Anonimo, the race started badly, tailed off in the middle and the less said about the end the better. Riccardo Simonsechi’s team came into the first leeward rounding struggling with a broken headsail. Once the sail was up, they started upwind only to get about 500 metres before a sickening crunch was heard and the masthead crane at the top of the mast hung limply having snapped clean off. Simoneschi is hoping for the predicted Mistral to bring a temporary halt to racing tomorrow giving him time to try and sort things out.

Siemens made a considerable comeback in the second day. Porto Cervo, 25 September 2007. Photo copyright Nico Martinez

At the start of the third race, Cristabella and DSK Comifin were in the wrong again, this time with even more illustrious company. What unfolded next was close to a miracle. Whilst Patches, with Stuart Childerley on the helm and Ian Walker calling tactics, gave the proverbial masterclass in winning from the front, Coutts and Artemis put on one in recovering position with owner Torbjorn Tornqvist on the helm. Start last, finish fourth. Coutts made it sound relatively easy, “we were quite late going back, so we lost on the fleet. But the boat is fast and we had a lot of boat speed today. We did the first beat pretty nicely and that got us to the back of the fleet. Fortunately it was quite windy in the last race which was certainly another factor that helped us on the first run pass a few boats downwind.” Artemis rounded the first windward mark in 10th, by the leeward gate she was 8th and second time around at the top she was 5th after initially heading right on the beat, whilst Patches and the rest headed left. There was certainly a little good fortune involved as a couple of boats ahead on the first run appeared to gybe one shift earlier than Artemis to get back into the favourable current further offshore.

Provisional standings after 5 races
1. ARTEMIS Torbjorn Tornqvist, SWE, 6-1-1-2-4-14.00
2. PATCHES Eamon Conneely IRL, 1-5-9-8-1-24.00
3. MEAN MACHINE Peter de Ridder, MON, 7-4-6-3-6-26.00
4. STAY CALM Stuart Robinson, GBR, 12-7-2-4-3-28.00
5. WINDQUEST Doug DeVos, USA, 8-6-5-1-11-31.00
6. MUTUA MADRILENA Bablio Sail Project, CHI, 9-2-13-7-5-36.00
7. SIEMENS Alberto Roemmers, ESP, 4-3-10-5-2-36.00
8. CAM Leon/Sanchez, ESP, 5-12-8-6-5-36.00
9. GLORY John Buchan, USA, 3-13-3-10-7-36.00
10. CRISTABELLA John Cook, GBR, 2-DSQ-4-11-10-43.00

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