Archive | November, 2005

Logjam at top of Monsoon Cup standings

Posted on 30 November 2005 by Valencia Sailing

After nine of 17 scheduled flights of the inaugural Monsoon Cup, the celebratory 50th event of the Swedish Match Tour, there are five skippers in a logjam at the top of the standings.

The leader depends on whether you consider total wins as the basis for leading or winning percentage. And then there are tiebreakers to consider.

If you choose winning percentage then there’s a three way tie for the lead. Crews led by Chris Dickson (BMW Oracle Racing), Peter Gilmour (PST) and Staffan Lindberg (Alandia Sailing Team) all have four wins in five races, a winning rate of 80 percent. The three haven’t raced each other yet.

If you go for total wins then Ian Williams (Williams Racing Team) is the event leader. Williams’ 5-2 record is good for a winning rate of 71 percent. Magnus Holmberg (Victory Challenge) is also 5-2, but Williams holds the tiebreak advantage after yesterday’s come-from-behind win in Flight 2.

The 50th event of the Swedish Match Tour is offering great racing, and the regatta isn’t even out of the round robin stage yet.

“Today was a thoroughly enjoyable day of racing,” said Tour director Scott MacLeod, who prefers number of wins as the basis for leading. “There was everything to like; lead changes, penalties and the sultan racing.”

The Sultan of Terengganu, Sultan Mizan Zainal Abidin, sailed two races with Gilmour. They won against Thierry Peponnet and lost against Dean Barker. The sultan was treated to some classic “crash” Gilmour racing in their match against Peponnet. The Frenchman who is skipper of the K-Challenge syndicate got an early lead on the reigning two-time Tour champion by playing the left side of the first leg.

Gilmour, however, held starboard tack approaching the windward mark. Peponnet seemed to be just crossing, but Gilmour hunted him down as they converged. Gilmour clipped Peponnet’s transom, which pushed the bow of the port-tack boat down and into the windward mark. The umpires issued three penalties, two to Gilmour.

“We gave a penalty to Gilmour for breaking Rule 16, a right-of-way boat altering course,” said Chief Umpire John Standley, who umpired the match. “We also gave a penalty to Peponnet for hitting the mark. But Gilmour gained an advantage so we gave him a second penalty. It was fairly straightforward.”

Gilmour stretched enough of a lead over the next lap and a half to perform his penalty turn on the finish line and win. But afterwards apologies were flying on his boat. “I apologized to the sultan,” Gilmour said, “but he said don’t worry, it was the most fun of the race.”

The Gilmour-Peponnet match wasn’t the only with contact. Williams and Dickson rubbed gunwales, while Coutts and Peponnet also got up close and personal. So far in the event the umpires have had 48 requests for calls from competitors and 24 penalties have been issued. “That’s a high proportion,” said Standley. “It shows the sailors aren’t putting up questionable Y flags.”

Just over half of the 17 scheduled flights have been completed. Principal Race Officer Peter Reggio said he had hoped to complete 10 flights by this time. After the round robin the top eight advance to the quarterfinals while the bottom four are eliminated.

The round robin is scheduled to resume tomorrow at 10:00 a.m.

Round Robin Standings after 9 of 17 flights

1. Chris Dickson (NZL) BMW ORACLE Racing, 4-1
= Peter Gilmour (AUS) PST, 4-1
= Staffan Lindberg (FIN) Alandia Sailing Team, 4-1
4. Ian Williams (GBR) Williams Racing Team, 5-2
5. Magnus Holmberg (SWE) Victory Challenge, 5-2
6. Dean Barker (NZL) Emirates Team New Zealand, 3-2
7. Russell Coutts (NZL) Coutts Racing Team, 3-3
8. Francesco Bruni (ITA) Luna Rossa Challenge, 2-3
9. Björn Hansen (SWE) Team Apport.Net, 2-4
10. Thierry Peponnet (FRA) K-Challenge, 2-5
11. Cameron Dunn (NZL) Mascalzone Latino – Capitalia, 1-6
12. Sally Barkow (USA) Team 7, 0-5

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Logjam at top of Monsoon Cup standings

Posted on 30 November 2005 by Valencia Sailing

After nine of 17 scheduled flights of the inaugural Monsoon Cup, the celebratory 50th event of the Swedish Match Tour, there are five skippers in a logjam at the top of the standings.

The leader depends on whether you consider total wins as the basis for leading or winning percentage. And then there are tiebreakers to consider.

If you choose winning percentage then there’s a three way tie for the lead. Crews led by Chris Dickson (BMW Oracle Racing), Peter Gilmour (PST) and Staffan Lindberg (Alandia Sailing Team) all have four wins in five races, a winning rate of 80 percent. The three haven’t raced each other yet.

If you go for total wins then Ian Williams (Williams Racing Team) is the event leader. Williams’ 5-2 record is good for a winning rate of 71 percent. Magnus Holmberg (Victory Challenge) is also 5-2, but Williams holds the tiebreak advantage after yesterday’s come-from-behind win in Flight 2.

The 50th event of the Swedish Match Tour is offering great racing, and the regatta isn’t even out of the round robin stage yet.

“Today was a thoroughly enjoyable day of racing,” said Tour director Scott MacLeod, who prefers number of wins as the basis for leading. “There was everything to like; lead changes, penalties and the sultan racing.”

The Sultan of Terengganu, Sultan Mizan Zainal Abidin, sailed two races with Gilmour. They won against Thierry Peponnet and lost against Dean Barker. The sultan was treated to some classic “crash” Gilmour racing in their match against Peponnet. The Frenchman who is skipper of the K-Challenge syndicate got an early lead on the reigning two-time Tour champion by playing the left side of the first leg.

Gilmour, however, held starboard tack approaching the windward mark. Peponnet seemed to be just crossing, but Gilmour hunted him down as they converged. Gilmour clipped Peponnet’s transom, which pushed the bow of the port-tack boat down and into the windward mark. The umpires issued three penalties, two to Gilmour.

“We gave a penalty to Gilmour for breaking Rule 16, a right-of-way boat altering course,” said Chief Umpire John Standley, who umpired the match. “We also gave a penalty to Peponnet for hitting the mark. But Gilmour gained an advantage so we gave him a second penalty. It was fairly straightforward.”

Gilmour stretched enough of a lead over the next lap and a half to perform his penalty turn on the finish line and win. But afterwards apologies were flying on his boat. “I apologized to the sultan,” Gilmour said, “but he said don’t worry, it was the most fun of the race.”

The Gilmour-Peponnet match wasn’t the only with contact. Williams and Dickson rubbed gunwales, while Coutts and Peponnet also got up close and personal. So far in the event the umpires have had 48 requests for calls from competitors and 24 penalties have been issued. “That’s a high proportion,” said Standley. “It shows the sailors aren’t putting up questionable Y flags.”

Just over half of the 17 scheduled flights have been completed. Principal Race Officer Peter Reggio said he had hoped to complete 10 flights by this time. After the round robin the top eight advance to the quarterfinals while the bottom four are eliminated.

The round robin is scheduled to resume tomorrow at 10:00 a.m.

Round Robin Standings after 9 of 17 flights

1. Chris Dickson (NZL) BMW ORACLE Racing, 4-1
= Peter Gilmour (AUS) PST, 4-1
= Staffan Lindberg (FIN) Alandia Sailing Team, 4-1
4. Ian Williams (GBR) Williams Racing Team, 5-2
5. Magnus Holmberg (SWE) Victory Challenge, 5-2
6. Dean Barker (NZL) Emirates Team New Zealand, 3-2
7. Russell Coutts (NZL) Coutts Racing Team, 3-3
8. Francesco Bruni (ITA) Luna Rossa Challenge, 2-3
9. Björn Hansen (SWE) Team Apport.Net, 2-4
10. Thierry Peponnet (FRA) K-Challenge, 2-5
11. Cameron Dunn (NZL) Mascalzone Latino – Capitalia, 1-6
12. Sally Barkow (USA) Team 7, 0-5

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Schooner America

"Schooner America" to be auctioned, expected to visit Valencia in 2007

Posted on 29 November 2005 by Valencia Sailing

A battle of the yachting nations will commence at 16.00 GMT on Wednesday 14 December 2005 between the USA and the rest of the world as the replica of the first ‘America’s Cup’ winner, America, is auctioned at the Royal Thames Yacht Club in London.

With the America’s Cup itself now held in Europe’s hands, and with teams pouring millions of dollars into campaigns to win it back, the Americans are keen to gain the psychological advantage of taking possession of the yacht America before the 2007 America’s Cup.

“There is no second” was the famous reply made to Queen Victoria in 1851 when she asked ‘Who came second?’ after the original schooner America won the Royal Yacht Squadron’s race around the Isle of Wight, raced for a Cup of One Hundred Sovereigns.

Schooner America
“There is no second” is a phrase that Nicholas Bonham – former Chairman of Bonhams Auctioneers and an international yachtsman who has raced both the 12-Metre and the more modern America’s Cup yachts – is likely to remind bidders, for the replica of the yacht that the America’s Cup took its name from, when he conducts the auction. Only one will win the Lot of course… Auction registration forms are online at www.saleofamerica.com.

The original yacht was destroyed in 1942 and this ‘original replica’ was built in 1967 by an American yachting enthusiast. Bonham enthuses “She is a breathtaking boat that has been built in the spirit of tradition. Despite her being a replica she is recognised by the yachting world as authentic and her sale will cause an enormous ‘noise’ amongst yachting communities around the world.”

To possess such pedigree is a rare opportunity in itself, but her present owner has also devised plans for a refit and an itinerary including a guest appearance at the 2007 America’s Cup in Valencia (in 2001 at the 150th America’s Cup anniversary in Cowes America was the flagship for the event, loaned to the Royal Yacht Squadron). Nicholas Bonham adds “America provides a wonderful hospitality opportunity as she is definitely the ‘best seat in the house’ at future America’s Cups and other international regattas.”

Schooner America
It is appropriate that America is to be auctioned in England, since it was in Cowes that the original crew won the ‘One Hundred Sovereign Cup’ in 1851. She was brought to England to participate in the Great Exhibition (an event intended to show off Great Britain’s superiority as a nation) by an American syndicate that commissioned her building to show the best of America – with instructions from the New York Tribune: “if you do go and are beaten, you had better not return to your country”. By beating fourteen British yachts that day, in front of Queen Victoria (who described her as “pretty”) America not only won the first ever international yachting challenge, she also reaffirmed the emergence of the United States of America as a world power.

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Schooner America

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"Schooner America" to be auctioned, expected to visit Valencia in 2007

Posted on 29 November 2005 by Valencia Sailing

A battle of the yachting nations will commence at 16.00 GMT on Wednesday 14 December 2005 between the USA and the rest of the world as the replica of the first ‘America’s Cup’ winner, America, is auctioned at the Royal Thames Yacht Club in London.

With the America’s Cup itself now held in Europe’s hands, and with teams pouring millions of dollars into campaigns to win it back, the Americans are keen to gain the psychological advantage of taking possession of the yacht America before the 2007 America’s Cup.

“There is no second” was the famous reply made to Queen Victoria in 1851 when she asked ‘Who came second?’ after the original schooner America won the Royal Yacht Squadron’s race around the Isle of Wight, raced for a Cup of One Hundred Sovereigns.

Schooner America
“There is no second” is a phrase that Nicholas Bonham – former Chairman of Bonhams Auctioneers and an international yachtsman who has raced both the 12-Metre and the more modern America’s Cup yachts – is likely to remind bidders, for the replica of the yacht that the America’s Cup took its name from, when he conducts the auction. Only one will win the Lot of course… Auction registration forms are online at www.saleofamerica.com.

The original yacht was destroyed in 1942 and this ‘original replica’ was built in 1967 by an American yachting enthusiast. Bonham enthuses “She is a breathtaking boat that has been built in the spirit of tradition. Despite her being a replica she is recognised by the yachting world as authentic and her sale will cause an enormous ‘noise’ amongst yachting communities around the world.”

To possess such pedigree is a rare opportunity in itself, but her present owner has also devised plans for a refit and an itinerary including a guest appearance at the 2007 America’s Cup in Valencia (in 2001 at the 150th America’s Cup anniversary in Cowes America was the flagship for the event, loaned to the Royal Yacht Squadron). Nicholas Bonham adds “America provides a wonderful hospitality opportunity as she is definitely the ‘best seat in the house’ at future America’s Cups and other international regattas.”

Schooner America
It is appropriate that America is to be auctioned in England, since it was in Cowes that the original crew won the ‘One Hundred Sovereign Cup’ in 1851. She was brought to England to participate in the Great Exhibition (an event intended to show off Great Britain’s superiority as a nation) by an American syndicate that commissioned her building to show the best of America – with instructions from the New York Tribune: “if you do go and are beaten, you had better not return to your country”. By beating fourteen British yachts that day, in front of Queen Victoria (who described her as “pretty”) America not only won the first ever international yachting challenge, she also reaffirmed the emergence of the United States of America as a world power.

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Dean Barker wins 2005 New Zealand Match Racing Championship 2005

Posted on 27 November 2005 by Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team New Zealand helmsman Dean Barker sailed into today’s finals with a clear lead over the competition. Barker selected to race 22 year old Simon Minoprio (Vision Yachting). This left BMW Oracle racing skipper Chris Dickson to sail Cameron Appleton (K-Challenge).

In the first race Barker beat Minoprio by 35 seconds, but in the second race Minoprio lead from start to finish taking the win by 9 seconds. Race 3 and the winner would go through to the finals. It was a tough battle right from the start, with Minoprio leading Barker to the top mark for the first time. Minoprio then picked up a penalty for hitting the top mark. At the top mark for the last time Minoprio had a 5 boat length advantage and there were numerous gybes and luffs on the run as Minoprio tried to clear his penalty by getting one on Barker. Coming into the Committee Boat Barker got the inside and was able to sneak home as Minoprio completed his penalty turn on the line. This secured a finals place for Barker & crew.

In the other semi final Dickson bet Appleton twice to secure his spot in the finals.

In the petit final Appleton beat Minoprio by 12 seconds in the first race and 6 seconds in the second to secure 3rd place for the regatta.

In the finals Dickson & Barker went head to head for 5 straight matches leaving the decider to the 5th and final match. The lead changed numerous times but Barker sailed home to win the final race by 12 seconds and the New Zealand championships for the 3rd time.

Following his 3rd place, Appleton will be invited to fill the last available spot in the International Sailing Federation-sanctioned and grade one Auckland Match Racing Cup, which will take place between ten skippers and their crews on the Waitemata Harbour across five days beginning January 25. Barker and Dickson have already been invited to take part.

In January, Appleton will compete against some of the best sailors in the world including number one-ranked Ed Baird (Team Alinghi) and Sebastian Col (K-Challenge).

Photo copyright: Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron

Photo copyright: Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron

Photo copyright: Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron

Photo copyright: Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron

Photo copyright: Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron

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Dean Barker wins 2005 New Zealand Match Racing Championship 2005

Posted on 27 November 2005 by Valencia Sailing

Emirates Team New Zealand helmsman Dean Barker sailed into today’s finals with a clear lead over the competition. Barker selected to race 22 year old Simon Minoprio (Vision Yachting). This left BMW Oracle racing skipper Chris Dickson to sail Cameron Appleton (K-Challenge).

In the first race Barker beat Minoprio by 35 seconds, but in the second race Minoprio lead from start to finish taking the win by 9 seconds. Race 3 and the winner would go through to the finals. It was a tough battle right from the start, with Minoprio leading Barker to the top mark for the first time. Minoprio then picked up a penalty for hitting the top mark. At the top mark for the last time Minoprio had a 5 boat length advantage and there were numerous gybes and luffs on the run as Minoprio tried to clear his penalty by getting one on Barker. Coming into the Committee Boat Barker got the inside and was able to sneak home as Minoprio completed his penalty turn on the line. This secured a finals place for Barker & crew.

In the other semi final Dickson bet Appleton twice to secure his spot in the finals.

In the petit final Appleton beat Minoprio by 12 seconds in the first race and 6 seconds in the second to secure 3rd place for the regatta.

In the finals Dickson & Barker went head to head for 5 straight matches leaving the decider to the 5th and final match. The lead changed numerous times but Barker sailed home to win the final race by 12 seconds and the New Zealand championships for the 3rd time.

Following his 3rd place, Appleton will be invited to fill the last available spot in the International Sailing Federation-sanctioned and grade one Auckland Match Racing Cup, which will take place between ten skippers and their crews on the Waitemata Harbour across five days beginning January 25. Barker and Dickson have already been invited to take part.

In January, Appleton will compete against some of the best sailors in the world including number one-ranked Ed Baird (Team Alinghi) and Sebastian Col (K-Challenge).

Photo copyright: Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron

Photo copyright: Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron

Photo copyright: Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron

Photo copyright: Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron

Photo copyright: Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron

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NZ Match Racing Championships – No racing on Saturday, too much wind

Posted on 26 November 2005 by Valencia Sailing

No racing was possible on Saturday as winds in Auckland were too strong. As a result, Dean Barker (Emirates Team New Zealand), Simon Minoprio, Chris Dickson (BMW Oracle Racing) and Cameron Appleton (K-Challenge) advance to the semi-finals that will take place on Sunday.

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NZ Match Racing Championships – No racing on Saturday, too much wind

Posted on 26 November 2005 by Valencia Sailing

No racing was possible on Saturday as winds in Auckland were too strong. As a result, Dean Barker (Emirates Team New Zealand), Simon Minoprio, Chris Dickson (BMW Oracle Racing) and Cameron Appleton (K-Challenge) advance to the semi-finals that will take place on Sunday.

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